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December 6, 2001

Angus McBean at Galleria Carla Sozzani, Milan

ANGUS MCBEAN
Photographs
Galleria Carla Sozzani, Milan

6 December 2001 - 13 January 2002

Angus McBean (1904 -1990) was the last true surrealist in the history of photography and one of the most original twentieth-century British photographers. At the end of the '30s he revived a movement that had been repudiated due to the natural evolution of its greatest members.

He was an unusual individual who fit into the rigid schemes of a conservative society for years before rebelling against the system.

He left a steady job with Liberty, the respectable London department store, to dedicate himself to his art, first making papier-mâché masks which were soon appreciated as decorative objects in high society, and later turning to photography.

His rise to success as a transgressive photographer was not easy; a 1940 article in the authoritative British Journal of Photography attempted to dismantle him.

And yet, he was a star portrait photographer, much in demand for his imaginative and fantastic compositions. What was wrong with Angus McBean, according to the traditionalists in photography, was that he violated the rules of composed studio photography, with its lights and backdrops in gentle hues in the taste of his day. His portraits were, on the contrary, dominated by violent and dramatic contrasts. This style, which we now appreciate for its modernity, attracted the great actors of British theatre, tired of being portrayed in stuffy poses.

In 1936, a very young and beautiful actress made her debut on the stage: Vivien Leigh. McBean’s gentle portrait of her veiled in subtle melancholy won Leigh the part of Rossella in Gone with the wind. But Angus McBean not only made innovative portraits, he revolutionised photography. He had a three-dimensional concept of the portrait, which with artful virtue he managed to set in 'scenic' situations. He used sand, papier-mâché columns, seashells, puppet theatres, lovely turn-of-the-century toys and other objects to create sets in which to insert his subjects, often using the craftiest techniques of photomontage and skilful tricks in the darkroom. The result is a highly improbable and fascinating image.

Angus McBean’s work does not attempt to stupefy us and overwhelm us in a maze of surrealistic situations. What he does is destabilise the rules with refinement to encourage adventures of the imagination.   

With a rare sense of humour, Angus McBean manages to reconcile intellectual challenge, sophisticated fun and beauty in images that are truly unique in modern and contemporary photography.

He had such a great influence on the history of photography that in 1983 and 1984 – at the age of eighty – he was invited to Paris to take fashion photographs in his unique style for prestigious magazines.

Angus McBean’s works are rare, precious signed and dated vintage photographs, exhibited with his own descriptions and notes.

Galleria Carla Sozzani
Corso Como 10 - Milan
www.galleriacarlasozzani.org

December 1, 2001

Raoul Dufy de Beaubourg à Lyon

 

On apprend par un communiqué de presse de la mairie de Lyon que le musée des Beaux-Arts de la ville se voit confier par le Centre Georges Pompidou, en dépôt de longue durée, une oeuvre essentielle de Raoul Dufy. Il s'agit du décor conçu par l'artiste pour le bar-fumoir du théâtre du Palais de Chaillot à Paris. Commandé par l'Etat en 1936, peu après la Fée électricité, ce triptyque monumental de plus de 12 mètres de long a pour sujet La Seine, de Paris à la mer . Dominée par les trois figures féminines de la Seine et de ses affluents, la composition déroule un vaste paysage panoramique animé de savoureux détails. Ce décor a été réalisé par Raoul Dufy à l'aide du "Médium Maroger", qui lui garantissait à la fois transparence et profondeur. Invisibles depuis leur enlèvement du Palais de Chaillot au début des années 60, ces panneaux désormais restaurés, retrouvent à Lyon une destination voisine de celle pour laquelle ils avaient été entrepris, puisqu'ils constituent, depuis le 27 novembre 2001 le décor des Terrasses Saint-Pierre, le restaurant du musée.

October 1, 2001

Epson Colorio PM-730C Printer

The Epson Colorio PM-730C share the 4-pl microdots and MSDT (Multi-Size Dot Technology) with the higher-ranking model of Colorio serie (Colorio PM-890C), yielding attractive photo output with high 1440 dpi resolution.
This printer is designed for users who wish to print out photos in a variety of forms, and it come packed with fun photo output functions. For starters, it support BorderFree printing on cut paper, a function that has enjoyed strong popularity since its announcement at the end of 2000. The printer let the user enjoy printing out BorderFree photos of size L and 2L, just right for albums, and also greeting postcards, with no border at all, on official-size inkjet postcards. The Epson Colorio PM-730C is the first low-price printer to offer BorderFree printing.
The Epson Colorio PM-730C is ready to use Print Image Matching, the advanced technology with high digital camera compatibility that is quickly gaining popularity. When using a combination of a digital camera with this function and a printer compatible with it, Print Image Matching applies a print command to photo data when the digital camera captures it, and the printer uses this command to print. The resulting data can faithfully recreate the intended color, brightness, etc. as captured by the digital camera or record the desired coloring optimized by the user at the site of the image, thus yielding perfect digital photo printouts.
Epson PhotoQuicker 3.1, software for easily printing high-quality photos, comes standard with the Epson Colorio PM-730C. Epson PhotoQuicker 3.1 is compatible with the new Print Image Framer function. This means that in addition to the standard layouts found in Epson PhotoQuicker3.1, users can add other desired frame layouts to their printed photos, including photo frames and New Year and other seasonal frames.
Finally, the Epson Colorio PM-730C already had standard-equipment drivers for the new Windows XP operating system set to launch in November 2001. Drivers also come standard for Windows 95/98/Me/2000/NT4.0 and for Macintosh. The printer driver is packed full of functions, including a new feature that lets even low-resolution images (such as those downloaded from the Internet) print out attractively, and functions suited for text document printing, such as multi-page printing and stamp marks.
Launch date for Japan: October 5, 2001 - Japanese Price (exc. tax): 24,800 yen
Photo (c) 2001 - Seiko Epson Corp. - All rights reserved

Epson Colorio PM-830C Printer

The Epson Colorio PM-830C share the 4-pl microdots and MSDT (Multi-Size Dot Technology) with the higher-ranking model of Colorio serie (Colorio PM-890C), yielding attractive photo output with high 1440 dpi resolution.
This printer is designed for users who wish to print out photos in a variety of forms, and it come packed with fun photo output functions. For starters, it support BorderFree printing on cut paper, a function that has enjoyed strong popularity since its announcement at the end of 2000. The printer let the user enjoy printing out BorderFree photos of size L and 2L, just right for albums, and also greeting postcards, with no border at all, on official-size inkjet postcards. The Epson Colorio PM-830C have greatly enhanced BorderFreeTM printing speed that is 70% faster than the earlier release Epson Colorio PM-880C in L size [1].
The Epson Colorio PM-830C offer roll paper printing for continuous BorderFree printing on roll paper as a standard feature. Users can print a succession of digital camera images on roll paper and even print out striking panoramic shots with ease. This is space-saving model with a standard-equipment roll paper holder that can be mounted simultaneously with the cut paper sheet guide.
The Epson Colorio PM-830C is ready to use Print Image Matching, the advanced technology with high digital camera compatibility that is quickly gaining popularity. When using a combination of a digital camera with this function and a printer compatible with it, Print Image Matching applies a print command to photo data when the digital camera captures it, and the printer uses this command to print. The resulting data can faithfully recreate the intended color, brightness, etc. as captured by the digital camera or record the desired coloring optimized by the user at the site of the image, thus yielding perfect digital photo printouts.
Epson PhotoQuicker 3.1, software for easily printing high-quality photos, comes standard with the Epson Colorio PM-830C. Epson PhotoQuicker 3.1 is compatible with the new Print Image Framer function. This means that in addition to the standard layouts found in Epson PhotoQuicker3.1, users can add other desired frame layouts to their printed photos, including photo frames and New Year and other seasonal frames.
Finally, the Epson Colorio PM-830C already had standard-equipment drivers for the new Windows XP operating system set to launch in November 2001. Drivers also come standard for Windows 95/98/Me/2000/NT4.0 and for Macintosh. The printer driver is packed full of functions, including a new feature that lets even low-resolution images (such as those downloaded from the Internet) print out attractively, and functions suited for text document printing, such as multi-page printing and stamp marks. The Epson Colorio PM-830C also had the "Duplex Printing Function" that can be set from the driver for large text document printing jobs. Used in tandem with plain paper for double-sided printing, this feature can prove remarkably economical for large jobs.
[1] Printing conditions: printing on PM photo paper, L size, cut paper, quality mode.
Launch date for Japan: October 5, 2001 - Japanese Price (exc. tax): 34,800 yen
Photo (c) 2001 - Seiko Epson Corp. - All rights reserved

Epson Colorio PM-890C Printer

The Epson Colorio PM-890C represents a doubling of resolution from 1440 dpi to 2880 dpi. Microdots as small as 4 pl and MSDT (Multi-Size Dot Technology) produce rich image gradation.
It is designed for users who wish to print out photos in a variety of forms, and this printer come packed with fun photo output functions. For starters, it support BorderFree printing on cut paper, a function that has enjoyed strong popularity since its announcement at the end of last year. The printer let the user enjoy printing out BorderFree photos of size L and 2L, just right for albums, and also greeting postcards, with no border at all, on official-size inkjet postcards. The Epson Colorio PM-890C had greatly enhanced BorderFree printing speed that is 70% faster than the earlier release Epson Colorio PM-880C in L size [1].
The Epson Colorio PM-890C offer roll paper printing for continuous BorderFree printing on roll paper as a standard feature. Users can print a succession of digital camera images on roll paper and even print out striking panoramic shots with ease. This is space-saving model with a standard-equipment roll paper holder that can be mounted simultaneously with the cut paper sheet guide.
The Epson Colorio PM-890C, like the earlier high-end model Epson Colorio PM-920C, is equipped to print CD-R media and thick paper. It prints directly on widely available white-label CD-R media. This function works not only on the 12-cm CD-R media as in the past but also 8-cm CD-Rs.
Using the standard-equipment EPSON CD Direct Print2 utility, users can easily print original photo and audio CD-R labels. It also handles thick paper media up to 2.5 mm, making it a good choice for creating in-store displays.
The Epson Colorio PM-890C is ready to use Print Image Matching, the advanced technology with high digital camera compatibility that is quickly gaining popularity. When using a combination of a digital camera with this function and a printer compatible with it, Print Image Matching applies a print command to photo data when the digital camera captures it, and the printer uses this command to print. The resulting data can faithfully recreate the intended color, brightness, etc. as captured by the digital camera or record the desired coloring optimized by the user at the site of the image, thus yielding perfect digital photo printouts.
Epson PhotoQuicker 3.1, software for easily printing high-quality photos, comes standard with the Epson Colorio PM-890C. Epson PhotoQuicker 3.1 is compatible with the new Print Image Framer function. This means that in addition to the standard layouts found in Epson PhotoQuicker3.1, users can add other desired frame layouts to their printed photos, including photo frames and New Year and other seasonal frames.
Finally, the Epson Colorio PM-890C already had standard-equipment drivers for the new Windows XP operating system set to launch in November 2001. Drivers also come standard for Windows 95/98/Me/2000/NT4.0 and for Macintosh. The printer driver is packed full of functions, including a new feature that lets even low-resolution images (such as those downloaded from the Internet) print out attractively, and functions suited for text document printing, such as multi-page printing and stamp marks. The Epson Colorio PM-890C also had the "Duplex Printing Function" that can be set from the driver for large text document printing jobs. Used in tandem with plain paper for double-sided printing, this feature can prove remarkably economical for large jobs.
[1] Printing conditions: printing on PM photo paper, L size, cut paper, quality mode.
Photo (c) 2001 - Seiko Epson Corp. - All rights reserved

Epson Colorio Serie New Printers

Seiko Epson Corporation announce the Epson Colorio PM-890C printer with "Multi Play Print" for 2880-dpi high image quality, CD-R label printing and BorderFree (entire surface) printing; the Epson Colorio PM-830C for BorderFree and roll paper printing; and the Epson Colorio PM-730C entry-level model, the first low-price printer to offer BorderFree printing. These three products launch October 5, 2001 from Epson Sales Japan.
Prices (excluding tax) and launch date for these products are as below.
Epson Colorio PM-890C - Price (exc. tax): 45,800 yen
Epson Colorio PM-830C - Price (exc. tax): 34,800 yen
Epson Colorio PM-730C - Price (exc. tax): 24,800 yen
Launch date for the three models: October 5, 2001
Epson forecasts that sales of the Epson Colorio series, including four new products, will reach 4.5 million units in the next one year.

September 10, 2001

Hommage au cineaste Jean Rouch

La Documentation française publie dans sa collection Afrique contemporaine, sous la direction scientifique de François Gaulme, un dossier spécial autour du thème Culture et société où elle rend hommage au cinéaste Jean Rouch. Le cinéma africain est un sujet insuffisamment traité. C'est ce manque que comble Afrique contemporaine en publiant deux articles sur Jean Rouch. L'un est une interview de Jean Rouch lui même dont les souvenirs permettent de mieux mesurer l'apport personnel du cinéaste à la culture africaine (L'ethnographe et le cinéaste : un «véloportrait» des origines) ; l'autre, un article de Brice Ahounou (Jean Rouch et la grande sécheresse du Sahel. Les dieux se fâchent à Gangel. Divinités en colère et anthropologie visuelle), fait un bilan sur l'évolution du cinéma ethnographique universitaire. Afin d'enrichir la réflexion, un article posthume de Pierre Haffner fait le point sur le cinéma africain contemporain, francophone comme anglophone. Le dynamisme des médias africains est pour sa part abordé sous l'angle de la Tanzanie, un des pays les plus pauvres du continent, mais aussi un de ceux où la liberté d'expression est une tradition nationale. Culture et société - Actualité africaine Dossier spécial La Documentation française Collection Afrique contemporaine n° 196 Octobre-décembre 2001 168 pages, 13,50 €

September 7, 2001

SportCult Curated by Euridice Arratia at Apex Art

 

Satch Hoyt, The Don KingDom, 2001Apex Art Curatorial Program

 

SportCult

Curated by:

Euridice Arratia

 

Artists:

Carlos Amorales - Gustavo Artigas - Elisabetta Benassi - Ana Busto and Sandra Seymour - Mónica de la Torre and Bruce Pearson - Godfried Donkor - Satch Hoyt - Michaela Schweiger - Grazia Toderi

 

© Satch Hoyt, The Don KingDom, 2001
Courtesy the artist and Apex Art, New York

 

It’s no wonder that sports function with such power in society. Often it is a nation’s identity itself that is sports’ principal narrative. Sports recount compelling stories of individual exploits and collective yearnings, but they also act as a meeting ground where far-ranging issues commingle, sometimes in contradiction. Side by side in the complex field of sports, one finds notions of leisure and entertainment and of bodily regimens and discipline, notions of athletes as symbols of local pride and idealism and as commodities and corporate entities. Coming from diverse backgrounds and using a variety of media, the artists included in SportCult point to the pervasiveness of the sports culture and its richness for metaphorical play.

The work of video artists Grazia Toderi and Elisabetta Benassi (Italy) dwells in the charged intersection between the sport arena and private and collective dreams.

Carlos Amorales explores in his performances the world of lucha libre (wrestling), a wildly popular entertainment in his native Mexico.

 Carlos Amorales, Carlos Amorales vs. Carlos Amorales, 2000

© Carlos Amorales, Carlos Amorales vs. Carlos Amorales, 2000
Courtesy the artist and Apex Art, New York

 

Gustavo Artigas, From the VS series: #4, 2001Gustavo Artigas (Mexico) stages and documents “sport events,” hiring semi-professional players to play soccer, basketball, or, in the case of his installation for SportCult, mudwrestling. 

In her interactive work Carrera, the German artist Michaela Schweiger revels in the childhood fascination with mimetic play.

Godfried Donkor (Ghana-UK) and Satch Hoyt (Jamaica) both investigate how race and corporate power mix it up in the world of boxing. Godfried Donkor has created wallpaper specifically for the exhibition,depicting eighteenth-century boxers superimposed on the pages of the London Financial Times.

  © Gustavo Artigas, From the VS series: #4, 2001
   Courtesy the artist and Apex Art, New York

 

Satch Hoyt, in his figural work, takes as a point of departure the famous impresario Don King in creating his sculpture made entirely of boxing gloves.

The soundscape Night Fights, created by Ana Busto (Spain) and Sandra Seymour (USA) is an aural excerpt of the intense life of the boxer.

And keeping with the interdisciplinary spirit of this exhibition, the Mexican poet Mónica de la Torre, has teamed up with the American artist Bruce Pearson to create a piece conjoining text and image that looks at the culture of recreation sports.

A color brochure containing an essay by Euridice Arratia will be available free of charge.

 

Apex Art, New York
September 7 - October 6, 2001

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September 1, 2001

Yasumasa Morimura’s Homage to Frida Kahlo

 

Yasumasa Morimura

An Inner Dialogue With Frida Kahlo

at Luhring Augustine in New York

 

Luhring Augustine presents a new series of self-portraits by Japanese artist Yasumasa Morimura. This body of work pays homage to the extraordinary Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. Morimura recreates, relives and indulges in the painters artistic process, vividly depicting the glamorous yet agonizing life of this remarkable woman

An Inner Dialogue with Frida Kahlo is the crystallization of a project that has taken ten years to complete. Inspired by her remarkable life and career, Morimura becomes Frida Kahlo in this exhibition to reveal her world of joy, suffering, and mental and physical pain, and to seek a process by which healing may occur. Yasumasa Morimura describes Kahlo’s art as a “fierce and intense manifestation of human sentiments and universal themes, such as joy, anger, sorrow, happiness, beauty, life, and love.” It’s these themes that have provided inspiration for Morimura in this new body of work.

Widely known as the artist who transforms himself into the Mona Lisa and movie actresses, Yasumasa Morimura has won international acclaim for his unique and avant-garde expression of “beauty.” Since 1985, his focus has been his “self-portrait” series, consisting of unique reconstructions of art masterpieces in which the subject’s face is substituted with that of Morimura himself. Through careful study and analysis of the themes, artists, and historical background of these works, Morimura searches out their raison d’etre and transforms them according to his own interpretations. His ability to deconstruct, subvert and simultaneously create an homage is what enables his work to continually defy categorization.

This exhibition is on view simultaneously at Galerie Thaddeus Ropac in Paris, the Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, in Tokyo and a selection of works travels to the Steirischerbst Museum in Graz.

Yasumasa Morimura has shown extensively in international solo exhibitions, and his work is in the following selected collections: The Yokohama Museum of Art, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo, The Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, The Modern Art Museum, Fort Worth, The Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

 

Yasumasa Morimura
An Inner Dialogue With Frida Kahlo

September 8 – October 6, 2001

LUHRING AUGUSTINE
531 West 24th St
New York 10011

La Photographie Hongroise des avant-gardes aux années 80

La Photographie hongroise ou l'Ecole des paradoxes
La Hongrie constitue à bien des égards, un paradoxe sur la scène artistique mondiale du XX° siècle. En effet, la puissance de création et de diffusion artistique d'un pays s'est toujours mesurée très largement à sa capacité politique et économique d'imposer ses vues aux autres Etats, à l'image de la France au début du siècle et, plus largement, des Etats-Unis depuis la Seconde Guerre Mondiale. Or, la Hongrie a connu une période d'intense créativité au moment même de son affaiblissement politique suite à la défaite de la Triple Alliance, à l'issue de la Première Guerre Mondiale. A l'inverse, Vienne, qui était le centre névralgique de l'Empire Austro-hongrois et incarnait un des pôles essentiels de l'avant-garde artistique européenne avec la Sécession, connaît une année 1918 qui marque, selon l'écrivain Karl Krauss, " la fin du monde ". En une seule année disparaissent successivement les principaux animateurs de l'école de Vienne que furent Gustav Klimt, Koloman Moser, Otto Wagner et Egon Schiele. Budapest, au même moment, voir surgir toute une génération de jeunes créateurs qui, par leurs personnalités et leurs modes d'expressions vont incarner une nouvelle modernité et élargir les frontières de l'art. La Hongrie incarne dans le panorama de l'art mondial un autre paradoxe, parfaitement souligné par Karoly Kincses : entre la fin de la première guerre mondiale et l'intervention militaire soviétique à Budapest (1956), plus de dix photographes marquants du XX° siècle ont quitté leur pays d'origine, ce qui fait de la Hongrie " le plus grand exportateur de photographes mondialement connus " : Brassaï, Martin Munkàcsi, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, André Kertész, Robert Capa et son frère Cornell Capa, Gyorgi Kepes, Nicholas Murray, Paul Almasy, Lucien Hervé ou Ata Kando. Comme si pour s'épanouir les artistes hongrois devaient répondre aux appels de Berlin ou de Vienne dans un premier temps, puis de Paris et New York. La situation économique et politique difficile de la Hongrie au cours de cette période ne se répercute donc pas sur la capacité de la Hongrie à faire naître des talents mais se traduit plutôt par son incapacité à les conserver dans ses frontières. Cette fuite des cerveaux, comme nous l'appellerions aujourd'hui, fut donc non seulement liée aux soubresauts politiques mais également à l'incapacité de ce pays d'offrir les conditions nécessaires à l'émergence d'une scène artistique viable économiquement, hors de la soumission aux forces politiques dominantes. Pourtant, l'entre-deux-guerres a été une ère d'épanouissement pour la photographie hongroise grâce aux progrès techniques et à l'intérêt du grand public. Ainsi, la photographie hongroise commence à être reconnue sur la scène internationale, à tel point que l'on parle de style hongrois pour caractériser ce culte du beau, de la forme plutôt que du contenu, ce souci de l'esthétique plutôt que de l'engagement. Mais, parallèlement à ce courant " esthétisant " va se développer une photographie plus soucieuse du contenu, plus ouverte aux problèmes de son époque et plus proche des réalités. Elle sera représentée par deux courants : le photo-journalisme et la socio-photo, le premier se concevant comme un regard objectif sur le mode d'un Munkàcsi peut apparaître comme une excellente synthèse du réalisme photographique et du style hongrois, comme une rencontre heureuse entre la forme toujours très élaborée et le contenu au plus proche des réalités. Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, quant à lui, porte le style hongrois aux limites de l'esthétique, avec son avant-gardisme triomphal où les lois propres du support devaient annihiler toute subjectivité. De la même manière, les photographies de Paris réalisées par Brassaï croisent habilement la flânerie romantique à la façon de Walter Benjamin (Paris, capitale du XIX° siècle) et le quasi relevé topographique de l'architecture de la ville, entre subjectivité et objectivité, entre forme et sens. Robert Capa, figure mythique du photo-journalisme de guerre, qui a su retranscrire pour nous la guerre d'Espagne ou le débarquement de Normandie, était également tout aussi soucieux du contexte que de son aspect formel. Autre point commun de cette génération prodigue, la capacité de faire entrer de nouveaux modes d'expression dans le domaine artistique. Que la photographie de mode ou le photo-journalisme constituent des courants transversaux de l'expression artistique n'étonnera aujourd'hui personne, mais c'est sans doute grâce à des hommes tels que Munkàcsi et Capa (et bien d'autres photographes hongrois) qu'une telle ouverture d'esprit est désormais possible. Cette capacité de porter un mode d'expression au niveau de l'excellence artistique, de le détourner de ses fins purement marchandes ou informatives est peut-être le principal héritage de la photographie hongroise. Belle réussite en réalité que cette diaspora de photographes qui n'aura pas eu besoin de se fédérer en courant, en " isme ", pour rayonner jusqu'à nous.
Maximilien Queyranne
Parle-t-on de la photographie hongroise, on pense aussitôt à des artistes aussi célèbres qu’André Kertész, Brassaï, Martin Munkacsi, Robert et Cornell Capa, Lucien Hervé, György Kepes, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Eva Besnyö, Sylvia Plachy et bien d’autres... Avec leur renommée mondiale, ces artistes partagent, sans exception, d’être hongrois et d’avoir, à l’âge adulte, émigré de Hongrie. Leur connaissance de la photographie, leur approche, leur relation au monde se sont forgés pendant leurs années passées en Hongrie, mais c’est à l’étranger qu’ils sont devenus célèbres, au point de s’inscrire dans l’histoire de la photographie du vingtième siècle. Cependant, nombre de leurs contemporains restés en Hongrie, qui avaient les mêmes origines et les mêmes ambitions, sont allés aux mêmes écoles, ont eu la même formation. Pour n’avoir pas quitté leur pays, ils n’avaient pas moins de valeur ni de talent, mais la place de la Hongrie dans l’histoire de l’Europe centrale les a condamnés à l’isolement. Qui connait le monde d’un Angelo, d’un Jozsef Pecsi, probablement le photographe le plus novateur des années vingt et trente, d’un Nandor Barany, d’un Zoltan Zajky qui, dans le nouveau style positiviste, ont laissé des oeuvres à jamais restés uniques ? Les meilleurs des reporters photographes hongrois, Rudolf Balogh, Karoly Escher ou Denes Ronaï, ont su montrer qu’ils savaient, tout autant qu’Erich Salomon ou Werner Bischof, aller au coeur de l’événement. Et que dire encore des meilleurs étudiants du Bauhaus, Judit Karasz, Iren Blüh et les photographes sociaux hongrois, rassemblés autour de Lajos Kassak ? Nous avons pensé que cet ensemble considérable mais mal connu avait une place aussi légitime que brillante dans une exposition sur l’histoire de la photographie hongroise entre 1920 et 1945. Parmi les collections du musée hongrois, nous avons choisi des photographies d’auteurs d’origine hongroise de renommée mondiale, et, parallèlement, des images d’artistes qui sont restés en Hongrie, en veillant à la cohérence des différentes tendances rencontrées. Il nous a semblé juste de rajouter à la liste des " restés sur place " les oeuvres d’artistes tels que Ferenc Csik, Lajos Lengyel, Denes Ronaï, Kalman Szöllösy, Ernö Vadas.
Karoly Kincses, Conservateur du Musée de Kecskemet
Dans le cadre de la Saison Hongroise MAGYart et en partenariat avec l'Association Française d'Action Artistique (AFAA), le Musée du Montparnasse présente « La Photographie Hongroise des avant-gardes aux années 80 dans les collections du Musée Hongrois de Kecskemet », du 12 septembre au 28 octobre 2001. Les commissaires de l'exposition sont, pour la Hongrie, Karoly Kincses, Magdolna Kolta et, pour la France, Monique Plon.
La Photographie Hongroise est surtout connue par des artistes tels que : André Kertész, Brassaï, Martin Munkacsi, Robert Capa, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Lucien Hervé, Paul Almasy et bien d'autres... Tous ces artistes nés en Hongrie ont souvent eu un parcours commun. Après des études à Budapest dans les années vingt, ils partent pour Vienne puis Berlin qui est alors le centre artistique de l'Europe, mais la montée du nazisme en 1933 les obligent à se réfugier à Paris ou New York. A côté de ces grands noms, d'autres photographes, restés en Hongrie, ont su, malgré les vicissitudes rencontrées dans leur pays et l'isolement, imposer un style, un culte du beau ou un même souci du réalisme que leurs compatriotes émigrés. Dans cette exposition, on peut voir côte à côte, les oeuvres des artistes restés au pays et celles de ces photographes qui, à travers l'oeil, ont gardé une même sensibilité originelle et développé une ouverture et une réflexion théorique que leurs compatriotes moins connus ont partagées. Cette exposition s'efforce de faire découvrir, en apportant un nouveau regard sur les maîtres de la Photographie Hongroise, célèbres ou moins célèbres, mais tout aussi talentueux tels que Angelo, Josef Pecsi ou Nandor Barany. Tous ces " vintages " et photographies originales des collections du Musée de Kecskemet, près de Budapest, ont été rassemblés et conservés par Karoly Kincses et sa collaboratrice Magda Kolta. Leur érudition, leur grande connaissance de la photographie, les dons des artistes et des collectionneurs ont fait du petit Musée de Kecskemet, un lieu incontournable pour les amoureux de la photographie.
Les photographes Hongrois émigrés
Lucien AIGNIER Paul ALMASY Ferenc ASZMANN Ferenc BERKO Eva BESNYO Irène BLÜHOVA BRASSAÏ Cornell CAPA Robert CAPA Emeric FEHER Francis HAAR Lucien HERVE Ata KANDO György KEPES Lajos KERESZTES André KERTESZ Ergy LANDAU György LORINCZY Mari MAHR Laszlo MOHOLY-NAGY Miklos MÜLLER Martin MUNKACSI Sylvia PLACHY Gustave SEIDEN
Ceux qui sont restés en Hongrie
ANGELO Rudolf BALOGH Nandor BARANY Zoltan BEREKMERI Ferenc CSIK Karoly ESCHER FG HALLER Judit KARASZ Lajos LENGYEL Jozsef PECSI Marian REISMANN Denes RONAÏ Kata SUGAR Kalman SZÖLLÖSY Ernö VADAS Istvan VECSENYI
Informations pratiques : Horaires d'ouverture : mercredi au dimanche inclus (fermé lundi et mardi) de 13h à 19h - Tarifs : Plein : 25 frs - Réduit : 20 frs (étudiants, + de 60 ans, chômeurs, carte Amis du Louvre et ICOM) - Groupe : 20 frs/ personne - Accès : Métro : lignes 4, 6, 12, 13, station Montparnasse ou Falguière - Bus : 28, 48, 58, 89, 91, 92, 94, 95, 96

RUBRIQUE EXPOSITIONS PHOTOS - SALONS - EVENEMENTS

August 18, 2001

512MB Transcend CompactFlash Memory Card Announcement

Version française à venir
In August 2001, Transcend Information, Inc. announced that CompactFlash Memory Card Capacity Leaps Ahead to 512MB
Now, businessmen can carry a library of information in their pocket, and professional digital photographers can get an entire photo shoot on a single memory card. Transcend has doubled the available capacity on a single Transcend CompactFlash Memory Card to 512MB. In addition, all Transcend flash memory cards are now in a newly designed package, makes it even easier to spot Transcend flash memory on retailers's shelves.
CompactFlash is the world's most popular removable mass storage device. CompactFlash was designed based on the popular PC Card (PCMCIA) standard, and the technology has resulted in the introduction of a new class of advanced, small, lightweight, low-power, mobile products that has significantly increased the productivity and enhanced the lifestyle of millions of people. These mobile products include: digital cameras, digital MP3 players, handheld PCs, personal communicators, automobile PCs with GPS, digital voice recorders, digital photo printers, medical monitoring equipment, and many other devices.
With the rapid increase in the number of devices using CompactFlash memory cards, and people'ss enhanced reliance on them, capacity, stability, and reliability are the major factors users consider when selecting a flash memory. Roy Wong, product manager for Transcend stated: "Transcend's 512MB CompactFlash Memory Card uses 4 1Gbit NAND Type flash memory chips with a high performance controller. The read speed is up to 5.2MB/sec and the write speed is up to 3.2MB/sec. The 512MB CompactFlash Memory Card also passed compatibility test to ensure users a hassle-free, worry-free digital life experience."
With the announcement of the new 512MB CompactFlash Memory Card, Transcend also presents new packaging for Transcend's flash memory products, including CompactFlash Memory Cards, SmartMedia Memory Cards and MultiMediaCard Memory Cards. The newly designed packaging comes with a user's manual, a warranty card, and a hard plastic memory card-carrying case, that helps users get the most out of their flash memory. The carrying case is specially designed for users to hold and protect the flash memory card during transportation. Once in this case, the memory card can be safely carried in a pocket, briefcase, purse, backpack, and etc.

July 13, 2001

World of Print Media: DVD by Print Media Academy of Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG


The Print Media Academy of Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG (Heidelberg) is publishing a new learning software package entitled "World of Print Media". This is a multimedia reference work that offer comprehensive expertise from the graphic arts industry. As an interactive learning software that also doubles up as a source of reference, it is intended primarily for students, trainees and newcomers to the graphic industry who want to extend and test their knowledge. It is also invaluable for anyone working with print media who wants to understand the various processes involved. 

World of Print Media comes as a DVD-ROM or a set of 5 CD-ROMs. It is available in English and German and costs around 160 Euro. 

World of Print Media
Illustration: Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG.

World of Print Media consists of several sections. The "Statistics & Trends" section provides up-to-date statistical data of how the various print media compare with other media. A further section explains how printing has developed over the years and is continuing to develop. The principles of printing are explained using historical shots of old "presses" and today's industrial printshop solutions. The individual stages and aspects involved in producing print media prepress, press, postpress, inks, vanishes and printing stock are dealt with on a neutral basis and are not specific to any given manufacturer. The trends for the future are dealt with across a broad sweep. The program explains how print and IT are merging to create successful, Internet-based business models. The explanations are underpinned by facts and figures. For example, over 350 million users worldwide used the Internet in the year 2000. This figure is expected to rise to 765 million by the year 2005. A look at tomorrow's print and media businesses examines customers' future needs and how technology will answer these. Process optimization through networking and greater integration will be at the forefront in this development. 

Finally, the various Heidelberg products are covered briefly in a product-specific part which explains the individual components. 

"We regard e-learning instruments such as CD-ROMs, DVD-ROMs and the Inter-net as a medium for augmenting conventional training units", explains Wolfgang Eisele, Head of the Print Media Academy. "Electronic media can be used to pre-pare students, thereby reducing the length of conventional seminars," adds Eisele. The benefits for students are obvious - they not only save time and costs and increase efficiency, but also allow students to learn whenever and wherever they want. The virtual classroom is global and knows no national frontiers or linguistic barriers. 

www.heidelberg.com


July 9, 2001

Cambo Wide DS Camera System

Cambo Wide DS Multiformat Camera System

Cambo introduces its new Cambo Wide DS, a portable, multiformat camera system that is sure to be a favorite among architectural and landscape photographers, especially those who have enjoyed the previous generations of CamboWide cameras. 

Cambo Wide DS Camera 
with Schneider Super Angulon Lens
Photo Courtesy Cambo

The DS is a compact 4x5 camera that accepts a variety of wide-angle lenses, and now provides "double-shift" movements — rise-and-fall and lateral shifts — which are perfect for anyone shooting exteriors and interiors, cityscapes and landscapes. The movements are precision-geared with positive-locking knobs. Movements are incorporated in the body of the camera, making it unlike the previous Wide, where the lens panel had an internal shift. Both movements have a precise millimeter scale for exact positioning.

Compared to other large format cameras, the Cambo Wide DS is extremely compact, portable and easy to operate. In addition to 4x5 sheet film holders, the Wide DS accepts 120 roll film holders that open up your shooting options to 6x4.5, 6x7, 6x9 and 6x12cm formats. A new 4x5 rotating back makes it easy to switch formats from horizontal to vertical.

"Cambo has done it again," Calumet International Product Manager Guy Shirm proclaimed. "They've taken a unique product and made it better. With the Cambo Wide DS you get a portable 4x5 (or roll film) wide-angle camera that uses the finest German optics and not only rise-and-fall but rear shift as well. This camera will be great for the backpacking photographer as well as the architectural photographer."

For plenty of wide-angle versatility, the Wide DS system offers a choice of four lenses that each feature different coverage characteristics. The Schneider Super Angulon 38mm XL, 47mm XL, 58mm XL and 72mm XL include helical focusing mounts on interchangeable lens plates. All lens plates have protective covers on guide bars around the front and the back for safe transport.

For additional shooting convenience, the Cambo Wide DS accepts a wide variety of Cambo accessories. A new optical viewfinder has been designed with a 120° viewing angle to ensure usage with all available lenses and film formats. The camera will also accept a range of viewing hoods, center filters, Polaroid and double-sheet film holders.

The Cambo Wide DS is made of a high-quality aluminum alloy for maximum stability, smooth and precise movements and lightweight portability. The convenient hand grip is made of handsome wood with rounded corners for a secure and safe grip and features a built-in cable release. Three internal spirit levels make it easy to level the camera for horizontal and vertical alignment, which is very important for critical architecture work. Aluminum parts are either anodized to prevent corrosion or painted with a black metallic paint for protection from the elements. For direct tripod mounting, a 3/8" thread is provided, but the camera is also compatible with Cambo’s quick-release system used with the CBH-5 QR Ball Heads.

The Cambo Wide DS is available through the Cambo international network of distributors.

Cambo's Web Site: www.cambo.com

June 29, 2001

Les Galeries d' art contemporain en France

Le Département des Etudes et de la Prospective du Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication publie Les galeries d'art contemporain en France. Portrait et enjeux dans un marché mondialisé. Cet ouvrage, réalisé par Françoise Benhamou, Nathalie Moureau et Dominique Sagot-Duvauroux, économistes et chercheurs à l'Université Paris I - Matisse - LES, est édité à La Documentation française. L'ouvrage résulte d'une étude quantitative et qualitative menée auprès des galeries françaises d'art contemporain. Il en dresse un portrait économique, révélant une situation fortement marquée par la crise du début des années 1990 et par la mondialisation du marché de l'art. L'enquête met en évidence dans ce contexte la fragilité des galeries et les difficultés qu'elles rencontrent pour assurer la promotion d'artistes encore peu connus, leur mission essentielle. Cet ouvrage s'interroge également sur le rôle des pouvoirs publics, tant en matière de réglementation que de soutien, sur les effets de leur action et la perception qu'en ont les acteurs. Il comble enfin un vide dans la connaissance du fonctionnement du marché de l'art contemporain, et pose la question du rôle et de l'avenir des galeries d'art contemporain dans un environnement en pleine mutation. L'étude s'ordonne en quatre chapitres - Les galeries d'art contemporain : des microentreprises très vulnérables - De nouvelles sources d'incertitude - Vers un marché oligopolistique ? - Nécessité et ambivalence du rôle des pouvoirs publics. Les galeries d'art contemporain en France. Portrait et enjeux dans un marché mondialisé Françoise Benhamou, Nathalie Moureau, Dominique Sagot-Duvauroux Département des Etudes et de la Prospective, Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication La Documentation française 216 pages, 18 €

May 15, 2001

François Lemoyne à Versailles (1688-1737)

 

Exposition
FRANCOIS LEMOYNE A VERSAILLES
(1688-1737)

Château de Versailles
15 mai - 12 août 2001

 

Après deux années de travaux, l'Apothéose d'Hercule retrouve enfin tout son éclat. Treize spécialistes ont travaillé à la restauration du plafond du salon d'Hercule exécuté entre 1733 et 1736 sur une surface totale de 480m2 avec toute la précision d'une toile de chevalet. Tout en préservant les altérations dues au vieillissement naturel de la toile, leur travail a mis en évidence l'histoire mouvementée d'une oeuvre unique qui conduisit son auteur au suicide après trois années d'un labeur inégalé.

A l'issue de ce chantier exceptionnel, le château de Versailles présente une exposition consacrée à François Lemoyne et à la genèse du plafond. Le visiteur pourra admirer, au début de la visite des Grands Appartements, l'ouvrage nouvellement restauré, puis découvrir l'exposition située dans les appartements de Madame de Maintenon.

Jusqu'à la réalisation du plafond de l'escalier de la résidence de Würzburg par Giambattista Tiepolo, l'Apothéose d'Hercule fut considérée comme la plus vaste composition peinte d'Europe. Le peintre s'était auparavant distingué par d'importants ensembles décoratifs dans les églises et les hôtels parisiens. Il chercha à s'imposer à Versailles par un art monumental hérité du Grand Siècle et parvint à le renouveler par l'usage de coloris clairs.

Appartenant à des collections dispersées de par le monde, les oeuvres rassemblées pour la première fois à Versailles depuis 1736 permettent de suivre pas à pas toutes les étapes de la préparation du plafond et de mieux comprendre les circonstances qui permirent à Lemoyne d'emporter la commande.

Avec La Continence de Scipion présentée au concours de peinture de 1727 (huile sur toile, Musée des Beaux-Arts de Nancy), l’artiste était parvenu à s'imposer parmi les figures marquantes de la peinture française.

Confronté à la difficulté de peindre une grande surface plafonnante, François Lemoyne avait dans un premier temps réalisé un modello "en forme", d'une taille douze fois inférieure à celle du plafond. Cette maquette, exemple unique dans l'histoire de l'art français, appartient aujourd'hui aux collections du château de Versailles.

Toutes les pièces exposées constituèrent pour François Lemoyne des étapes indispensables à l'élaboration de l'oeuvre finale. Les nombreuses études dessinées s'appliquent à décrire chacune des divinités présentes à l'Apothéose d'Hercule et témoignent de l’extrême attention que l’artiste porta à l’élaboration de son oeuvre monumentale.

Commissaire de l'exposition : Xavier Salmon, conservateur au musée national des châteaux de Versailles et de Trianon

Publication : Catalogue de l'exposition par Xavier Salmon, 80 pages, 130 photographies, Editions Alain de Gourcuff.

L'exposition se déroule dans les appartements de Madame de Maintenon.

 

François Lemoyne à Versailles (1688-1737)
Château de Versailles
Etablissement public du Musée et du domaine national de Versailles
15 mai - 12 août 2001

April 25, 2001

George Picken (1898-1971) at Monique Goldstrom Gallery, NYC

The Works of George Picken (1898-1971)
Monique Goldstrom Gallery, New York
April 27 - May 22, 2001

Monique Goldstrom Gallery presents the work of American painter George Picken (1898-1971).

George Picken was a prominent painter among the American generation that matured between the world wars in the first half of this century. His sensibilities were shaped by urban immigrant realties, World War I and the depression, and his close relationships with friends and colleagues like Stuart Davis, Edward Hopper, Charles Burchfield, John Marin, Philip Evergood, and Kuniyoshi. He also faced the wave of indifference felt by many of these artists as abstract expressionism captured the world's, and the criticsí attention. However, Picken pursued his own artistic vision, even as he experimented with abstraction and color. In his last decade, he returned to figurative work and painted some of his most powerful work. The artist died in 1971 at the age of 73.

George Picken was born in New York city in 1898, the son of a scottish immigrant artist and photographer. He served in World War I with an ambulance corps that saw action at Verdun.

Back in New York, he studied at the Art Students League and married Viola Carton, a young beauty from Yonkers who was said to be one of Reginald Marshís favorite models. The earliest canvases that survive have urban themes and a dark palette, which prompted Stuart Davis to ask him why he was always painting ìdungeonsî. Picken had a difficult time during the depression, supporting a wife and two children, but was employed by the WPA. His murals can still be seen near Albany, at the Fort Edward and Hudson Falls post offices.

George Picken also became well known as a teacher. He taught painting, printmaking and lithography at Cooper Union and Columbia University for over 20 years.

His work is in the collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Corcoran Gallery, the Newark Museum, the Berkshire Museum, the Ogunquit Museum and numerous other collections.

The exhibition encompasses works from each period of the artistís career.

Monique Goldstrom Gallery
560 Broadway Street Suite 303
New York, NY 10012
www.moniquegoldstrom.com

April 20, 2001

Eizo Announcements of release dates for North America

A selection of EIZO release dates for North America (2001-2008)


2008 October 23 EIZO Announces Color Matching Tool for Amateur Photographers
2008 October 3 EIZO Upgrades ColorNavigator Calibration Software Providing Compatibility with X-Rite's ColorMunki Photo and ColorMunki Design
2008 May 15 EIZO Announces Support for MAC OS X with OsiriPRO
2008 May 15 EIZO Announces RadiForce RX211 LCD Monitor for Color and Monochrome Imaging at SIIM 2008
2008 January 31 EIZO to Unveil ColorEdge CG301W 30" Widescreen Monitor with Hardware Calibration at PMA 2008
2008 January 31 EIZO to Introduce 22-inch ColorEdge CG222W Widescreen Monitor with Hardware Calibration at PMA 08
2007 June 19 EIZO Announces FlexScan Widescreen Monitors for Back Offices and Trading Rooms
2007 June 14 EIZO Introduces ColorEdge CG241W for High-End Still and Moving Image Work
2006 December 1 EIZO Unveils 4 Megapixel Widescreen Color Monitor for Medical Imaging
2006 November 26 EIZO Adds 24.1" Widescreen Format Model to FlexScan-M Series of Clinical Review Monitors
2006 November 26 EIZO Adds Four Monochrome Monitors to RadiForce Series
2006 November 1 EIZO Announces RadiForce RX210 LCD Monitor for Color and Monochrome Imaging at RSNA 2006
2006 September 11 EIZO Announces New 5MP LCD Monitors for Precise Digital Mammography Imaging
2006 August 17 EIZO Introduces ColorEdge CG221 LCD Monitor
2006 June 20 EIZO to Introduce Ultra-Thin 19" Monitor with 7 mm Side Bezels at SIA 2006
2006 February 24 EIZO Introduces Creator Edition (CE) Series with two additions to the ColorEdge Line of High-End Professional LCDs – ColorEdge CE210W and CE240W
2005 September 9 EIZO Expands LCD Offerings with FlexScan S2110W Widescreen Monitor
2005 August 3 EIZO Releases 3MP Color LCD Monitor for Medical Imaging
2005 July 25 EIZO Introduces 17" FlexScan M1700 LCD Monitor for Office Use
2005 June 2 EIZO's 3 MP Monochrome LCD Monitor for Medical Imaging
2005 May 5 EIZO Introduces FlexScan L997 LCD Monitor with Wide Range of Image and Color Control Functions
2005 May 3 EIZO Unveils ColorEdge CG210 LCD Monitor
2005 April 29 EIZO Releases New Gaming LCDs for Serious Computer Game Enthusiasts - FlexScan L778 and L578
2004 October 8 EIZO Introduces ColorEdge CG220 LCD Monitor at Graph Expo and PhotoPlus 2004
2004 October 8 EIZO Introduces ColorEdge CG19 LCD Monitor for Graphic Arts and Printing
2004 January 5 EIZO Announces Shipping of New Anti-Glare Monitor Hood for the ColorEdge Series of LCD Monitors
2003 November 17 EIZO Introduces 2 MP Color LCD Monitor for Medical Imaging
2003 November 17 EIZO Introduces RadiForce G51 and G31 LCD Monitors with 10-Bit Simultaneous Grayscale Display
2003 November 17 EIZO Receives FDA 510(k) Clearance from US FDA for All RadiForce Series Monochrome Medical Display Systems
2003 September 29 EIZO Upgrades ColorNavigator Calibration Software to Version 2
2003 August 1 EIZO Introduces Five Year Warranty for Select LCD Monitors
2003 June 18 Eizo Introduces ColorEdge Series of LCD Monitors for the Graphics Market at CeBIT America
2003 June 17 Eizo Announces 18.1" FlexScan L695 LCD Monitor at SIA Technology Management Conference
2003 April 8 Eizo Announces 21.3" FlexScan L985EX at FOSE 2003
2003 April 8 Eizo and Emergent OnLine Announce Exclusive eClient Partnership at FOSE 2003
2002 November 18 Eizo Ships New FlexScan P5072 during Comdex Fall 2002
2002 August 19 Eizo's FlexScan L685 Awarded DisplayMate Technologies' "Best Digital DVI Input LCD"
2002 June 25 New L665 18.1" Slim Bezel Display Completes MultiEdge Line at PC Expo
2002 March 19 Eizo Premieres New MultiEdge Slim Bezel Multimedia Displays at FOSE
2001 November 12 Eizo Announces Server Based Client Management Software
2001 November 12 Eizo Announces Five New Flat Panel Displays
2001 August 22 Eizo Ships High Performance 15" LCD Flexscan L365
2001 August 6 Eizo Ships High Brightness 17" FlexScan T565 CRT Display
2001 June 26 Eizo Nanao Premiers New Display Technologies at PC Expo
2001 April 16 Eizo Announces New FlexScan L461 16" SXGA LCD Flat Panel Display
Last update: 23.10.2008

April 18, 2001

Print Media Academy of Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG records successes in first year


The Print Media Academy of Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG (Heidelberg) was opened in April 2000 and has since established itself as a communication platform for the print and media industry and as a meeting point for visitors from the Rhine-Neckar region and the city of Heidelberg. 

The Print Media Academy received over 25,000 visitors in its first year. This figures does not include around 8000 course participants. Heidelberg's product training courses are particularly popular. The Academy offers a total of five modules: management training, product training, Print Manager Advanced Course, training courses for all Heidelberg employees, and seminars, forums and congresses. This event and training center for the graphic arts industry provides existing and prospective customers with the means to obtain practical training in the very latest market requirements. 


Illustration: Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG, Heidelberg, Germany


However, the Print Media Academy is more than just a meeting point for the graphic arts industry. It also serves as a point of focus for a whole range of cross-industry forums and congresses. On average, the Print Media Academy hosts an event every second day. It already has bookings well into the start of 2003. The rooms are used for press conferences, industry events, art and culture events, photo shoots and video recordings. By way of example, the Print Media Academy played host to Heidelberg's city tour guides, the Business Managers' Congress organized by the Chamber of Trade and Industry, the Members Association of Heidelberg University, and a "1st Tuesday" meeting by young entrepreneurs. 

The company is expecting a further 30.000 visitors by April next year. In addition to a wider choice of subjects for the management training courses, Heidelberg also plans to extend the Print Manager course. Places on the new Winter Semester 2001 can now be booked. Course participants do not require a university or college degree and, upon completion, will receive a Heidelberg certificate instead of an MBA (Master of Business Administration). Detailed information on the courses available at the Print Media Academy is available from www.heidelberg.com.

April 2, 2001

Digital Photo and Internet Survey

Survey reveals internet is not the first choice for finding pictures

Seventy per cent of agencies and publishers prefer to use a picture search facility other than the internet, according to a new survey. While use of the web continues to grow, the findings from over 700 picture users show that the majority would rather phone in a picture request or browse through a catalogue or CD-ROM than search online. The survey found that 77 per cent of design and advertising agencies and book and magazine publishers had used the internet to search for pictures, but only 30 per cent said they preferred to search online. Twenty six per cent said they preferred to telephone with a picture request, a further 26 per cent said they would rather look through a catalogue and 17 per cent favoured using a CD-ROM.

Maria Storey, marketing & communications director of the Science Photo Library, which conducted the customer survey, said: "You can get information from a printed catalogue that you can't get by looking at hundreds of images on a screen. There is a 'feel' to it. Users can flick through a selection and an idea may leap out from the page." "Although, with an internet search, you can put in keywords related to 'mood' or 'atmosphere', often designers are not looking for something as simple as that. They are looking for a concept or an idea and that may not easily translate into a single keyword." She said the best approach was to use all the available search methods and provide customers with the greatest degree of choice. The digital era had made it much easier to show customers picture selections before sending them out. It also allowed designers to produce layout designs quickly and easily. And the supply of high-resolution digital files has also speeded up the efficiency of the production process.

The survey also provided some positive feedback about SPL. Ninety-eight per cent ranked SPL's range of pictures highly, with 50 per cent finding it excellent and 48 per cent rating it good. On picture quality, the survey found 98 per cent were more than happy - 75 per cent thought it was excellent and 23 per cent said it was good. The research service was also given a boost by customers in the results. Fifty per cent rated it excellent and a further 42 per cent thought it was good. Comments from users were also favourable.

Jade Sienkiewicz, formerly of Wickens Tutt Southgate advertising said: "The range of subjects for more specific topics was very good - they do not fall into the usual typical photos of most other photo libraries." David Caunce, of the design company Imagine, said: "We used SPL in our work for 'Expo 2000' earlier this year. We were very impressed with the quality of both the images and service." The National Lottery Charities Board's Mark Merryfield, also commented that he was "very impressed with quality of photos and helpful service of staff". Maria Storey, said: "The results of the survey are very good news. Our photographers are long-standing professionals who continually strive to achieve high-quality, exciting images. All our researchers are science graduates, and providing clients with detailed captions is a strong feature of our service."

The Science Photo Library is the world's leading photo agency specialising in science, medicine and technology, with over 130,000 images in its collection. Independent, privately owned and the only one of its kind in Britain, SPL is renowned for its high quality picture bank, created by photographers, illustrators, scientists and medical specialists.

March 21, 2001

Olympus Camedia C-700 Ultra Zoom Digital Camera

Olympus introduce the CAMEDIA C-700 Ultra Zoom, a compact, easy-to-handle digital camera equipped with a bright, powerful, F2.8 - 3.5 10x optical zoom lens. The lens has a zoom range that is equivalent to 38 - 380mm on a conventional 35mm, and when used in tandem with the built-in digital zoom function, offers the equivalent of 1000mm telephoto power. The camera offers full-auto shooting convenience, and its compact size makes it extremely easy to handle. Olympus introduced its first 10x optical zoom digital camera, the CAMEDIA C-2100 Ultra Zoom, in August 2000. It was a camera that made the most of the inherent advantages of digital technology, and made the light-gathering power and versatility of a bright, F2.8 - 3.5 10x optical zoom lens accessible for the first time -- because on a conventional silver-halide film camera, such a lens would have to be extremely large and costly to produce. The new CAMEDIA C-700 Ultra Zoom makes this power even more accessible and affordable. Although it is even lighter and more compact than its predecessor, it offers the same high image quality because the lens is specifically designed to match the performance characteristics of the camera's 2.11-megapixel CCD. In addition, the 10x optical zoom can be used in tandem with the digital zoom function to achieve maximum telephoto power of 1000mm.
The CAMEDIA C-700 Ultra Zoom also features iESP* auto focus, iESP auto white balance, digital ESP light metering, as well as Portrait, Sport and other auto exposure modes. As a result, it makes high quality, 10x zoom photography extremely easy to enjoy. It also features manual exposure control, auto bracketing, multi-spot metering, one-touch white balance settings, and a range of other features for greater creative control. Ease of use is enhanced by a new settings menu that can be displayed on the camera's built-in color LCD monitor, and the AE lock button can customized by the user to provide instant access to frequently used settings. Other features include motion JPEG recording, sepia and monochrome shooting modes, and a White/Black board shooting mode.
With its light, compact body and 10x optical zoom lens, the CAMEDIA C-700 Ultra Zoom combines superior image quality with the inherent performance advantages of digital technology to offer consumers an entirely new photographic experience.
* iESP=Intelligent Electro Selective Pattern
Main Features
Bright, High-Performance 10x Optical Zoom Lens in a Compact Body
The CAMEDIA C-700 Ultra Zoom measures only 107.5mm (W) x 76mm (H) x 77.5mm (D) (excluding protrusions) and weighs only 310.5 grams. The lens incorporates one glass aspherical element and one element that is aspherical on both sides. As a result, it is extremely compact despite offering the advantages of a bright F2.8 - 3.5 aperture range and powerful 10x optical zoom. The camera's light, compact design makes it easy to carry, while the lens allows photographers to shoot everyday subjects in dramatic new ways, and capture subjects that they never could before. When used in combination with the digital zoom function, a maximum of 27x magnification is possible (equivalent to 1000mm telephoto on a 35mm film camera).
Built-In High-Performance Features
High-Performance Zoom Lens and 2.11-Megapixel CCD for Superior Image Quality
Image quality is outstanding because the lens is specifically designed to maximize the imaging potential of the camera's 2,110,000-pixel, 1/2.7-inch CCD. In addition, users can shoot in either JPEG or uncompressed TIFF mode, at sizes ranging from 1600 x 1200 pixels to 640 x 480 pixels.
High-Accuracy iESP* Autofocus
iESP autofocusing improves conventional center-weighted contrast analysis accuracy by dividing the center portion of the image into a greater number of sectors when performing analysis. As a result, focusing accuracy is less likely to be affected by background elements when the primary subject is not in the center of the frame.
* iESP=Intelligent Electro Selective Pattern
iESP Auto White Balance for Accurate Color
Proprietary iESP auto white balance technology compares average values for the entire frame with values for the area immediately around the subject to accurately determine subject color and surrounding lighting conditions. As a result, users are assured of natural colors and skin tones under a wide range of lighting conditions.
Easy Handling and Operation
New, Easy-to-Use Settings Menu
The settings menu displayed on the camera's built-in color LCD monitor has been significantly improved for greater ease of use. The top-level directory displays one gateway that gives users access to all of the advanced settings, and three gateways that users can customize to provide quick access to the settings they use most frequently. Even when using the full-function advanced settings gateway, a new four-tab menu display (Shooting, Image Quality, Card, Settings) makes it easy for users to find the setting they are looking for.
Convenient User-Programmable Custom Button
The AE Lock button does double duty as a custom button that users can set to perform a particular function. It's a convenient way to access features with a single touch.
Easy-to-Operate Control Buttons
Separate buttons are provided for flash, light metering and macro mode controls to allow these frequently used features to be activated at a moment's notice. A separate ON/OFF switch is also provided.
0.55-Inch TFT Color LCD Monitor
A built-in, 0.55-inch TFT color LCD monitor provides parallax-free viewing across the entire 10x zoom range. In addition, information about essential settings is displayed inside the regular viewfinder so that users can keep their eye to eyepiece when shooting ultra-telephoto pictures, moving subjects and motion JPEGs.
Storage-Class* USB Interface
A storage-class USB interface and USB cable are provided for fast easy downloading of large image files. In addition, image files in the camera can be manipulated using Windows Explorer or other third-party software applications.
* Supported operating systems: Windows 98; Windows 2000 Professional; Windows Me; Mac OS 9.0 or higher.
Versatile Modes for Enhanced Creativity
Versatile Exposure Modes
In addition to Program AE, Aperture-Priority AE, Shutter-Speed-Priority AE, Manual exposure modes, the CAMEDIA C-700 Ultra Zoom features full-auto Portrait, Sports and Landscape Photo exposure modes. In Manual exposure mode, shutter speeds of up to 16 seconds can be set. An AE lock function is also provided.
A Choice of Light Metering Modes
In addition to digital ESP metering (for backlit and high-contrast situations), spot metering is also offered. In Spot mode, users can take up to eight readings and fine-tune their exposures to get the precise results they want.
Exposure Compensation and Auto-Bracketing
Exposure compensation of up to +-2EV can be set in 1/3-step increments. In addition, a convenient auto-bracketing function is provided to automatically adjust the exposure settings up and down from the standard setting to ensure that a perfectly exposed picture is always captured.
Versatile Flash Mode Settings
In addition to Auto, Red-Eye Reduction, Off and Fill-In flash modes, a Slow Shutter Synchronization mode (with first- or second-curtain effect) is offered. As a result, photographers can capture natural-looking images of people with a darkened room or city lights in the background, as well as 'trails' created by moving lights or other subjects.
4-Step Pre-Set White Balance Settings
In addition to Auto White Balance, pre-set white balance settings are provided for daylight, overcast, tungsten light and fluorescent light. As a result, users can obtain correct color balance even if lighting conditions are too complex to be handled by the Auto White Balance function.
Sharpness Settings
Hard, Normal and Soft image sharpness settings allow users to choose the level of image sharpness that best suits their purpose (i.e., printing, image manipulation, etc.).
Contrast Settings
Image contrast can be set to High, Normal or Low according to the user's preference.
ISO Sensitivity Settings
ISO sensitivity can be adjusted to facilitate flash-free indoor photography, eliminate blurriness caused by camera shake at high telephoto settings, or otherwise achieve the user's creative goals. The settings are approximately equivalent to ISO 100, 200, 400 and 800.
Other Convenient Features
2.7x Digital Zoom for Telephoto Power Equivalent to 1000mm
2.7x digital zoom can be used in tandem with the 10x optical zoom lens to achieve seamless 27x zooming that offers maximum telephoto power equivalent to 1000mm on a conventional 35mm camera. The digital zoom can be used for both still and motion JPEG shooting.
Convenient File Name Setting
Consecutive numbering can be applied even when memory cards are removed and replaced, greatly simplifying image file management. Duplicate file and folder name problems are eliminated, and downloaded image files are much easier to organize and manage.
Special Shooting Modes
In addition to regular color images, the CAMEDIA C-700 Ultra Zoom can be used to take sepia or monochrome photos. There are also special White and Black board modes that automatically ensure maximum legibility when photographing text written on a white board or black board.
Continuous Shooting Mode
Continuous shooting is possible in all modes except TIFF. In HQ mode, more than six shots can be taken at a speed of approximately 1.5 frames per second.
Rotated Image Display
Captured images can be rotated by 90 degrees or 270 degrees for viewing. Pictures taken with the camera rotated for vertical framing will therefore be displayed with the correct orientation when viewed on the camera's LCD monitor, or as a slideshow displayed on a TV.
Audio Recording Capability
A built-in microphone is provided for audio recording. Sound can be recorded during motion-JPEG shooting, and a 4-second (approx.) sound byte can be recorded immediately after a still picture is taken. Still-image sound memos can also be recorded or re-recorded later, and recording can be switched off during motion-JPEG shooting if it is not needed.
External Flash Connection Terminal
An optional Olympus FL-40 dedicated external flash unit can be attached to the CAMEDIA C-700 Ultra Zoom via the optional FL-BK01 flash bracket and FL-CB01 bracket cable. With the FL-40 linked to the camera, photographers can take advantage of an expanded range of creative flash functions.
AV Output Terminal
An AV output terminal and cable are provided for sound and image playback on a standard TV set.
LB-01 (CR-V3) Lithium Battery Pack Included as Standard Equipment
Two CR-V3 lithium batteries are included as standard equipment. The batteries provide sufficient power for approximately 150 pictures under normal operating conditions; if the camera is operated continuously, over 4,000 pictures can be taken.1 NiMH batteries and an AC adapter are also available as options. If necessary, the camera can also be used with commercially available NiCd or alkaline batteries.
* Test conditions for continuous operation: SQ (640 x 480) mode, LCD monitor off, flash off, no image display or file downloading. Test conditions for normal operation: repeated 2-shot shutter release followed by 10 minutes of rest, HQ mode, LCD monitor on when shooting, flash used on 50% of shots, continuous AF off, Zooming for each shoot, no image display or file downloading.
Optional Conversion Lenses
By attaching an optional lens adapter CLA-4 to the CAMEDIA C-700 Ultra Zoom, photographers can extend the camera's shooting capabilities with the optional WCON-08 wide-angle conversion lens and MCON-40 macro conversion lens.
The company names and product names are the trademarks or registered trademarks of each company. Image (c) Olympus Corporation - All rights reserved - Olympus Press Release - 21.03.2001

March 9, 2001

Expo Photos - Ulla Jokisalo, La mémoire de mes images (1980-2000)

Ulla Jokisalo, La mémoire de mes images (1980-2000)

Musée d'Art de la Ville d'Helsinki, 9 mars - 3 juin 2001

Exposition rétrospective consacrée à une figure marquante de la photographie en Finlande sur un thème central de son oeuvre. Les photographies exposées ont été réalisées depuis les années 1980. Certaines ont déjà été présentées au public au cours d'expositions, d'autres sont inédites. Un livre sur l'oeuvre photographique d'Ulla Jokisalo est publiée à l'occasion de cette exposition. Cette dernière a bénéficié du soutien de la FINNFOTO, Fédération centrale des associations photographiques finlandaises.

Meilahti Art Museum
Helsinki, Finlande

Expositions suivantes au musée d’Art d’Helsinki :

DIY - Do It Yourself - Lives. L'art brut contemporain en Finlande, 16 juin - 28 octobre 2001
Sept identités filandaises. Une maison multimedia dans le musée, par Mario Rizzi, 11 novembre 2001 - 3 mars 2002
L'Altaï bleu. Johannes Gabriel Granö, photographe en Sibérie 1902-1916, 15 mars - 9 juin 2002

February 28, 2001

Hermes acquires part Leica Camera AG

Hermès acquires 31.5 % of the share capital of Leica Camera AG On 22nd of November 2000, Hermès International has launched a friendly tender offer for 30 % of the share capital of Leica Camera AG running until 20th of December 2000. The proposed price was 12.50 Euro per share, representing a 30 % premium on the average stock market price in the last three months preceding the offer. At the closing of the offer, Hermès International announces that it has acquired 31.5% (30 % on a fully diluted basis) of the share capital of Leica Camera AG for a total investment of 17.7 million Euro. The press release note "Hermès International and Leica Camera AG welcome the decision of the shareholders who have tendered their shares and allowed the success of this operation. "

February 25, 2001

August Sander Exhibit Getty Museum

August Sander: German Portraits (1918-1933)
Opens March 6, 2001 at the Getty Museum
Photographs by the Powerful German Master
This exhibition highlights more than 125 photographs that survey this German master's portraiture of the 1920s and early 1930s, and reveal the turbulent face of Germany during the Weimar period after WWI, just prior to the rise of Adolf Hitler's Third Reich. The exhibition will be on view from March 6 through June 24, 2001, at the J. Paul Getty Museum. It examines a significant period of Sander's prolific career through works that were selected from more than 1200 Sander photographs in the Getty's collection - the largest holding outside of Germany.
August Sander (1876- 1964) is revered in Germany as a father of modern photography. Since the 1920s, his work has had an enormous influence on generations of artists around the world. He is known primarily for his iconic photographs of farmers, artists, bricklayers, musicians, cab drivers, bureaucrats, dancers, industrialists, secretaries, the unemployed, and the disabled. Together these images form a collective "portrait" of pre-World War II German society, and reflect Sander's then-idealistic view of the existing social order. Many of these works will be on display at the Getty. Ironically, in the rise of the Third Reich, Sander himself became a focus of persecution. He eventually moved from Cologne to the relative safety of the countryside, leaving behind 30,000 glass negatives that were later destroyed by fire in 1946. Sander's photographs of his house and studio made before the Allied bombing of Cologne will also be on view in the exhibition.
Judith Keller, associate curator of the Getty's department of photographs, commented, "With each of our shows, the department of photographs tries to share with our audience more of the permanent collection. The Sander exhibition, drawn from our exceptional Sander holdings, takes another look at one of the masters of portraiture at a time when this genre is again popular with painters and photographers. In his own way, Sander employed his camera to put his country back together after World War I, one man, one picture at a time. His portraits take on added resonance in light of the devastating war that followed."
Sander reached artistic maturity during the Weimar Republic (1918-1933), when many German artists were inspired by a refreshing political freedom. Berlin had become an international artistic center and a new Realism in painting reflected observations about contemporary government and society. The era's cultural icons and references included the Bauhaus school, Joseph von Sternberg's film Blue Angel, Bertolt Brecht's Three Penny Opera, Alfred Döblin's novel Berlin Alexanderplatz, and Thomas Mann's The Magic Mountain.
Fueled by the Cologne Progressives, a group of radical young painters he met in the early 1920s, Sander embarked on a grand artistic enterprise. He began an ambitious project he called "Citizens of the Twentieth Century," and sought to portray the German social order through images of "types" or population groups. He began by revisiting his earliest portraits of peasants from his native Westerwald region and added an extensive series of portraits that blended his conservative views and nostalgia for the past with a progressive future vision. The photographs he created as part of this project are considered his most significant work.
With the rise of Hitler's political power and the advent of the Third Reich in 1933, Sander's career took a turn for the worse. His son Erich, a communist party member, was arrested, and Sander was scorned by the Nazi authorities. He moved to the small village of Kuchhausen and managed to bring with him and thus save 10,000 negatives. He was forced to abandon his politically sensitive work and concentrated instead on landscape photography. While he never completed his ambitious "Citizens" project, he left a compelling body of work reflecting the contradictory and complex nature of the era.
"Sander continuously walked the fine line between social satire and factual recording. Because of their multivalent character, Sander's photographs have been sources for artists working in a variety of materials from poetry to motion pictures," commented Weston Naef, curator of photographs.
For this exhibition, the Getty photographs galleries will be organized into sections related to Sander's own hierarchy of subjects. These include: First and Last (from the rural peasants to the urban unemployed), Women and the Metropolis, and Tradesmen and Professionals, with a final section portraying his house and studio.
Concurrent with the exhibition, the Getty is publishing a new book about Sander in its In Focus photography series. It will be on sale at the Getty bookstore and online for $17.50 (paperback).
The In Focus series makes available in an affordable format the Museum's significant holdings of works by major photographers. Each volume contains approximately 50 photographs with commentaries, an introduction, a chronology, and a transcription of a colloquium on the photographer's life and work. Among the contemporaries of Sander featured in this series are André Kertész, László Moholy-Nagy, Man Ray, Alfred Steiglitz, and Doris Ulmann.

February 22, 2001

Spencer Finch: Here and There, Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Chicago


Spencer Finch: Here and There
Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Chicago
February 16 - March 23, 2001

New York artist SPENCER FINCH explores the borders of representation in his exhibition Here and There at Rhona Hoffman Gallery in Chicago. Utilizing a wide range of materials and techniques – from sculpture and installation to painting and drawing – Spencer Finch creates work that addresses the ways in which subjectivity, memory and language inform the act of seeing. 

Many of the works included in this exhibit study the effects that light and memory have on perception. The enchanting and poetic work titled Blue (sky over Los Alamos, New Mexico, 5/5/00, morning effect), an installation of light bulb molecules precisely matching the cobalt, titanium oxide, and ultramarine sky over Los Alamos, is on view in the small gallery. Mounted to the ceiling in complex arrangements the piece probes some of the great mysteries of the universe: color, light, gravity, time, and space as Spencer Finch explores the gaps between objectivity and subjectivity as well as his fascination with science and its limits.

SPENCER FINCH currently lives and works in NYC. He has had several recent solo exhibitions including Up, Postmasters Gallery, New York (2000); Bildhuset, Stockholm (1999); Wandering lost upon the mountains of our choice, Postmasters Gallery, New York (1998); Galerie Andreas Brandstrom, Stockholm (1998); Periscope, Artnode, Stockholm (1997).

RHONA HOFFMAN GALLERY
www.rhoffmangallery.com