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Expositions, Art contemporain, Art moderne, Photographie, Design, Patrimoine, Architecture, Art vidéo, Films, l'image dans toutes ses dimensions, Publications

Art Exhibitions, Art Fairs, Visual Arts, Photography, Graphic Arts, Design, Video Art, Architecture, Films, Photo / Imaging Equipments, Publications


December 23, 2000

Claude Monet, Les Villas à Bordighera, Musée d'Orsay


LES VILLAS A BORDIGHERA, 1884, tableau de CLAUDE MONET, a été acquis par l'Etat pour le musée d'Orsay, Paris

L'annonce a été faite par la Ministre de la Culture et de la Communication, Catherine Tasca, dans un communiqué du 22 décembre 2000.

Cette toile a été peinte pour Berthe Morisot à Giverny en 1884, à l’issue d’un séjour en Ligurie, au bord du golfe de Gênes. Jalon essentiel de l’œuvre de Monet dont la palette se transforme radicalement à cette époque, elle représente le jardin Moreno que le peintre qualifiait de « paradis terrestre ». Sur la droite apparaît la villa édifiée vers 1880 par Charles Garnier, architecte de l’Opéra de Paris, pour le baron Bischoffsheim, et à l’arrière-plan la villa Sant’Ampelio, deux lieux familiers à l’artiste.

Les Villas à Bordighera de Claude Monet avait fait l’objet, en mai 1992, d’une interdiction de sortie du territoire français. Afin de permettre son maintien dans le patrimoine national, le groupe GAN s’était porté acquéreur du tableau et l’avait déposé au musée d’Orsay, aux termes d’un accord conclu pour dix ans avec l’Etat en application des dispositions prévues par la loi sur le mécénat culturel, qui permet aux compagnies d’assurances d’inscrire dans leurs provisions techniques les investissements réalisés pour l’acquisition d’oeuvres d’art.

Cette acquisition d'un important tableau de Claude Monet a pu être réalisé grâce à une importante participation du Fonds du Patrimoine et au concours de mécènes privés.

December 10, 2000

Dada and Surrealist Art from Arturo Schwarz Collection at Israel Museum, Jerusalem


On december 2000, the Israel Museum, Jerusalem presented its first comprehensive exhibition of the Vera, Silvia and Arturo Schwarz Collection of Dada and Surrealist Art.

Dreaming with Open Eyes includes over 300 works by leading artists including Duchamp, Man Ray, Ernst, Breton, and Goya. Donated in 1998, this unique collection of over 750 works of art by some 200 artists were on view at the Israel Museum from December 22, 2000 through June 2001.

The gift of the Arturo Schwarz Collection, together with a library of over one thousand related books, pamphlets and artifacts donated in 1991, has transformed the Israel Museum into the largest repository in the world of Dada and Surrealist art and a global center for the study and display of these movements. "Dreaming with Open Eyes" takes advantage of Schwarz's scholarly insight to reveal the importance of the works on view, and incorporates his personal approach to the material in the exhibition. Paintings, drawings, sculptures, ready-mades, photographs and prints are complemented by unique items from the Museum's Dada and Surrealist library of art periodicals, documents, letters, and artists' books.

The presentation in Jerusalem will be followed by a major international tour. The exhibition will travel to the San Francisco Museum of Fine Arts, February - April 2002; the Art Gallery of Ontario, June - September 2002; and a third North American venue; and the Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach, Florida, and conclude with two venues in Japan. James Snyder, Director of the Israel Museum states: "Our Museum has a long history of important holdings in Modern Art and particularly in the fields of Surrealism and Dada. The Arturo Schwarz gift in 1998, on the occasion of the 50th Anniversary of the State of Israel, consolidates our position as a world center for these two movements, so central to the aesthetic and intellectual progress of the 20th century. We are proud that, in "Dreaming with Open Eyes", we are able to expose the full riches of these holdings and then to share them on tour in North America and in Japan."

Dada
The Dada movement emerged in Europe and the United States in reaction to the horrors of World War I. This enclave of artists rebelled against artistic convention and sought to subvert the existing social and political order. Artists such as Marcel Janco, Raoul Hausmann, Max Ernst, and Francis Picabia represent this movement through works exemplify the key tenants of Dada: the accidental, the absurd, protest, and criticism.

Marcel Duchamp and Man Ray
The revolutionary work of Marcel Duchamp and Man Ray had a profound influence on Dada and Surrealist artists and was central to later trends in twentieth-century art. Duchamp and Man Ray met in New York in 1915, and from that time on were active, both independently and jointly, in avant-garde circles in New York and Paris. Arturo Schwarz met the two artists in the 1950's and demonstrated his appreciation for their work by arranging exhibitions, acquiring dozens of works, and composing scholarship on them. Seventy works by Man Ray and Duchamp reflect their fertile imaginations, and their preoccupation with humor, playfulness, and eroticism.

Forerunners of Surrealism
The Arturo Schwarz collection includes a sizable body of pre-Surrealist work, which, like the Surrealist movement that would follow, demonstrates a timeless interest in dreams, the supernatural, and the irrational. This portion of the collection includes paintings, prints, and drawings from the 16th through the 20th centuries by artists such as Durer, Goya, Moreau, and Redon, along with tribal masks and artifacts from Africa, Oceania, and North America. Surrealism The works of dozens of Surrealist artists from the 1920's to the 1980's are arranged in the exhibition according to visual and thematic criteria. The ideological platform of the Surrealist movement, formulated by Andre Breton in the 1920's, called for a new way of seeing. Disappointed by modern Western culture, many artists and writers had been inspired by Dada and had adopted a nihilist or anarchic stance. But Surrealism did not simply advocate subversion, it called for a change in values. The movement sought to stimulate the imagination, to expand the limits of awareness, and to tap into a non-rational, subconscious psychological realm, like that revealed in dreams and madness. Among the artists represented are some of the members of the original circle of the Surrealist movement in the 1920's and 1930's, such as Andre Breton, Joan Miro, Yves Tanguy, Andre Masson, and Max Ernst. Women artists including Claude Cahun, Remedios Varo, Kay Sage, and Dorothea Tanning are prominently featured among the Surrealist group on display, many of which achieved central standing in the canon of 20th century art history.

The Library
The final component of the exhibition is drawn from the Museum's extensive library of Dada and Surrealist materials, including a display of portraits of Surrealist artists and writers immortalized by their photographer and painter colleagues, as well as a selection of original Dada and Surrealist literary documents. The collaboration between artists revealed through these portraits and publications demonstrates the spiritual bond that existed among members of the movement.

About Arturo Schwarz
Scholar and collector Arturo Schwarz was born in 1924 in Alexandria, Egypt to Jewish parents. In his youth he was very active in clandestine political circles and was arrested a number of times prior to his expulsion from Egypt in 1949. Settling in Milan in the early 1950's, he opened a publishing house and a bookstore that evolved into the Schwarz Gallery, which closed in 1975. The gallery held exhibitions of the best Dada and Surrealist artists and of contemporary artists from throughout the world. Simultaneously, Schwarz wrote poetry, published scholarly books including a catalogue raisonne of the works of Marcel Duchamp, gave lectures, and organized international Dada and Surrealist exhibitions. His intense involvement in the Surrealist movement and his personal acquaintance with many of its members has made him a leading authority on its history. "Dreaming with Open Eyes" is curated by Tamar Manor-Friedman and is accompanied by a comprehensive 250-page catalogue, which includes an illustrated inventory of the works in the Arturo Schwarz collection in the Israel Museum.

November 14, 2000

Leica Camera AG Calendar 2001

Leica Camera AG has printed an impressive black-and-white wall calendar entitled 'My point of View' for the year 2001. The high-quality prints feature the work of six internationally successful Leica photographers, who have each chosen two of their favorite photos expressing personal points of view. The range of subjects is wide, extending from journalistic photos of Siberia and the Kosovo to nude photography and portraits of world-famous models. A tribute to the photographic artists who use their Leica camera with virtuosic creativity. Owners of this special calendar will be able to share their enjoyment of it as all the pictures reappear on the last page of the calendar as detachable postcards. The calendar is 43 x 59 cm in size, and is available at Leica stockists. The following photographers have contributed to the 2001 calendar: Bryan Adams Bryan Adams' photographic career began 3 years ago when he had the idea of taking the photos for his CD covers himself. Today he photographs famous celebrities from Kate Moss and Naomi Campbell to Tina Turner for magazines like Vogue, Marie Claire or MAX. Adams works in natural light and adapts to the particular situation, turning stars into people. Claudine Doury ...began taking photographs in 1989. Her first highly acclaimed piece of work was a report on the nurses' strike in Paris. Since the early Nineties she has focused on Russia and its people, receiving the Leica Oskar Barnack Award in 1999 for her photographic essay on nomads in Siberia. She is a member of the VU agency and lives - unless she's away on a project - in Paris. Claus Bjorn Larsen ...Born in 1963, Larsen is the shooting star among contemporary press photographers. Having worked for the renowned Danish daily newspaper Berlingske Tidende since 1996, he recently caused an international stir with his reports on the Kosovo. He won several awards for his sensitive pictures in 1999, including a first prize of World Press Photo, the Visa d'Or and the Fuji European Award. Maik Scharfscheer ...Born in 1964, Maik Scharfscheer lives in Wetzlar. Apart from his main activity as industrial photographer (customers include Renault, Nike, Davidhoff und Sony) he also works on subjects of his own choice. He took his close-ups while staying in Marrakesch: without a lot of technical equipment, but with feeling for the people he was photographing. Striking portraits in black-and-white. Pall Stefansson ...studied photography in Sweden and now lives in Iceland as a freelance photographer. He works regularly for newspapers such as the Iceland Review or the ship magazine Atlantica. He is also interested in landscapes. Stefansson takes photos in both color and black-and-white. He has called his latest cycle "Earth/Fire/Water/Air". A tribute to the elemental powers of nature. Adolf Zika ...was born in 1972. He lives and works as a freelance photographer in Prague, specializing in fashion and beauty. He takes photographs for Versace and Hermés or Playboy. Most of all, Zika likes working in a natural environment. His pictures radiate joie de vivre and are the expression of a more natural treatment of the human body and eroticism. His choice of black-and-white film is also quite in keeping with the modern trend. Last update: 08-2009

October 24, 2000

Cutting Edge Israeli Art at Israel Museum

 

A DOLL’S HOUSE

IRINA BIRGER - KAREN RUSSO – RUTI NEMET – ZOYA CHERKASSKY

 

A Doll's House is the fourth exhibition in the framework of the Joint project for young art at the Israel Museum. The four women artists taking part in this exhibition: Irina Birger, Karen Russo, Ruti Nemet and Zoya Cherkassky, are showing three installations in the exhibition. On the surface, their installation works differ one from the other both in character and in creative process, yet the common element is almost immediately apparent. Each work is made up of images taken from different 'artistic' fields: painting, sculpture or photography as well as images drawn from media sources such as voices taped from the television and internet, animation and especially cinematic images.

These many sources do not only serve to concretize the interdisciplinary characteristic of contemporary culture, each one in its own way also raises and interprets images connected to the more hidden worlds of mythology, folktales, fairy stories and the research of the sub-conscience. In Karen Russo's installation, The Mute, for example, the descent into a complex, hidden world is immediate and concrete. The work opens with a staircase leading down into a mine, a dark passage that receives the viewer in a physical manner and 'initiates' him into the other aspects of the installation. Russo sees her installation space as a cave in the depths of the earth, representing hell, madness, the kingdom of darkness and irrationality. The space contains scientific data, archaeological finds and figures and objects from folktales, horror stories and movies.

Part of a Russian animated film, The Snow Queen, is at the center of Irina Birger's installation, also entitled The Snow Queen, - a nostalgic passage into the world of folk tales as seen through the cinematic experience of childhood. The scene shown here can be read as an index to the entire story, which depicts the boy Kay's exit from the world into the Ice Kingdom and the palace of the Snow Queen, who represents all that is irrational and lacking in emotion. Kay is eventually redeemed from his imprisonment and returned to the world and the realm of reality with the help of his love, Gerda. Birgir brings this tale of dark magic to life by screening her images on, and through, a screen of glass stalactites.

Through doll-like figures of themselves and their friends, Ruti Nemet and Zoya Cherkassky replicate the intimate world of their circle. In their installation entitled Study-cases, they are recreated as frozen bodies, dense and tactile, healthily "dead", without having died or been killed. Ruti and Zoya use the dolls as a game that becomes an alternative world, created by the precise copying of their existing one. The extended time taken to create the dolls and their environments sharpens their reality and dialectic existence, until there is no contradiction between the "real" and the alternative, illusory time and place. Dream markers and realms of the imagination are only hinted at within the doll's bodies. The figures' faces are slightly contorted, bordering on the edge of a grotesque countenance, which hints at the possibilities of their belonging to a species of harmful figures.

The immediacy and concreteness of these installations, on the one hand, and their complexity as stories which also hint at a secret world, on the other, gives these works by Ruti Nemet and Zoya Cherkassky, Karen Russo, and Irina Birger an allegorical touch, a dimension of a fable whose meaning has vanished.

The exhibition was curated by Sarit Shapira.

Closing: January 2001

October 20, 2000

Vous avez dit photographie ? Guide Pratique

Rubrique Livres > Photographie - Guide professionnel
La Documentation française publie dans sa collection « Photodoc » un ouvrage intitulé « Vous avez dit photographie? Les adresses utiles de la photographie en France ». Pour sa troisième édition entièrement réactualisée qui comprend 100 nouvelles adresses, "Vous avez dit photographie ?" confirme sa place de répertoire de référence pour les professionnels de la photographie et pour ceux qui en sont passionnés. Guide pratique, l'ouvrage fournit une présentation claire et détaillée de 700 organismes jouant un rôle dans le domaine de la photographie en France. Organisé en sept chapitres, il répond aux différentes demandes d'information pour promouvoir la photographie, s'organiser, se financer, exposer-vendre, s'informer, se former, restaurer. Une liste des organismes classés par département permet de repérer d'un coup d'œil les lieux de la photographie dans sa région. Un index de 2000 termes facilite la recherche d'un organisme, d'un journaliste spécialisé, d'un photographe diffusé en galerie. Vous avez dit photographie ? La Documentation française Collection Photodoc 258 pages, 18 €

September 30, 2000

The Hasselblad Calendar 2001 - a gallery of photographic masterpieces

The Hasselblad Calendar 2001 - a gallery of photographic masterpieces

At the photokina 2000 exhibition, Hasselblad presents the forthcoming Hasselblad Calendar 2001. Its new concept and format is embodied in a fresh and contemporary graphic design. The primary aim of the carefully selected pictures is to present excellent photography that reflects current interest and creates a lasting impression on the viewer. The calendar will no doubt strongly appeal to both photographers and others interested in the visual arts. 

The calendar contains just over 40 images of various sizes, in colour as well as black & white, representing many fields of application without being linked under a specific theme. 

The Hasselblad Calendar 2001 presents the work of twelve highly skilled photographers, hailing from different parts of the world, all with various backgrounds and photographic styles. The majority are well established of worldwide repute, but the calendar also presents a number of up-and-coming photographers, with a fresh and exciting approach to photography. 

The photographers participating in the Hasselblad Calendar 2001 are: 
Anton Corbijn / England, Bernhard Edmaier / Germany, Isabel Muñoz / Spain, Hans van Ommeren / Holland, Mario Cravo Neto / Brazil, Michael Grecco / USA, Matilda Lindeblad / Sweden, Ian Patrick / France, Per Nagel / Denmark, Phyllis Galembo / USA, Howard Schatz / USA and Xie Mo / China. 

The chosen photographers, known as the Hasselblad Masters, will each be the subject of an in depth feature article released by Hasselblad on a monthly basis, starting with Anton Corbijn in October 2000. 

Victor Hasselblad AB, Göteborg, Sweden 

September 15, 2000

Andy Warhol series and singles - Fondation Beyeler


L’exposition « Andy Warhol - series and singles » se penche sur le principe génératif marquant de la série et retrace, avec plus d’une centaine d’œuvres exposées, l’ensemble de la création de cet artiste, dessinant une courbe impressionnante. Les tableaux les plus significatifs des principales séries (series) entretiennent ici un dialogue fécond avec de remarquables œuvres isolées (singles).
L’exposition suit le cheminement des six différents ateliers new yorkais de Warhol. Le Townhouse préside à la naissance des tableaux de comics et de biens de consommation peints à la main, à celle des images schématiques des séries Do It Yourself et Close Cover Before Striking ainsi qu’aux premières sérigraphies photographiques. Au Firehouse, un loft sans chauffage, Warhol a réalisé les séries de grand format Disaster et celle des œuvres argentées. La Factory bien connue n’a pas seulement servi de lieu de rendez-vous à l’avant-garde : c’est également là que les grandes séries de Jackie, Flowers et boxes, ainsi que les célèbres Marilyns ont vu le jour. Dans les années 1970, les ateliers d’Andy Warhol témoignent de ses réflexions sur une peinture expressive, tandis que les années 1980 sont essentiellement celles de sa propre rétrospective, des tableaux de poudre de diamant ainsi qu’à la série du Last Supper, à connotation religieuse.
Les premiers films intégrés dans cette exposition, comme Screen Tests, Empire, Blow Job, Kiss, Couch etc., grâce auxquels  Andy Warhol a laissé son nom dans l’histoire du cinéma, montrent à quel point ces deux moyens d’expression n’ont cessé de se nourrir mutuellement à travers toute son oeuvre.
Les oeuvres prêtées pour cette exposition, qui a pour commissaire Georg Frei, co-éditeur du catalogue raisonné de Warhol, proviennent d’importantes collections privées et des plus grands musées internationaux d’Europe, d’Amérique, d’Australie et du Japon. On pourra également admirer des œuvres longtemps considérées comme perdues ou qui n’ont plus été présentées au public depuis une trentaine d’années.
L’exposition Warhol coïncide avec l’inauguration des nouveaux locaux de la Fondation Beyeler. Les nouvelles salles semblent faites sur mesure pour rendre justice à l’importance de la série Disaster, qui comporte un certain nombre d’œuvres de grand format.
Catalogue: Andy Warhol - series and singles. Essais de Ernst Beyeler, Georg Frei, Peter Gidal et Edward Sanders. 210 pages, 106 ill. couleur. Edition allemande / anglaise, DuMont Verlag Cologne, 2000, 58.- CHF édition brochée.

Exposition Andy Warhol — series and singles
Fondation Beyeler
17 septembre - 31 décembre 2000
Heures d’ouverture : du lundi au dimanche de 10h00 à 18h00, le mercredi jusqu’à 20h00.
Fermé les 24 et 25 décembre
Entrée : CHF 15.- et CHF 11.-, 5.- (tarifs réduits)

September 4, 2000

Restructuring of Nikon in the United States - October 1, 2000

Establishment of new companies and strengthening the holding company- Restructuring of the subsidiaries in the United States
Nikon Corporation (YOSHIDA, Shoichiro president) will divide Nikon Inc., sales and marketing subsidiary in the United States, and separate both the Instrument Division (including the Surveying Department) and the Eyewear Department from it to establish two independent sales and marketing subsidiaries.
Nikon Inc. will remain as sales and marketing subsidiary for the imaging products including the sports and recreational optics.
The new companies will start operation from the coming October. This separation is in line with the in-house company structure which has been introduced at Nikon Corporation last October, and aims to further complete the integrated system of full authority and responsibilities for each product business sector and promote the decentralized management.
At the same time of this change, three companies function of financing as well as tax-related operation like consolidated tax payment will be centralized to Nikon Americas Inc., holding company established in 1981, which will strengthen such function and broaden its operation.
Outline of the new companies

Name of company: Nikon Instruments Inc.

Head office: Melville, New York

Representative: HIRAI, Takeshi President & CEO

Principal business: sales, marketing and after-sales service of microscope, measuring instrument, inspection instrument, surveying instrument in the North and South America

Start of operation October 1, 2000

Name of company: Nikon Eyewear Inc.

Head office: Melville, New York

Representative: HANAGATA, Masaki President

Principal business: sales, marketing and after-sales service of eyeglass frames in the United States

Start of operation: October 1, 2000

Outline of the holding company effective October 1, 2000

Name of company: Nikon Americas Inc.

Head office: Melville, New York

Representative: FUKUCHI, Hideo President & CEO

Principal business:

  1. Integrated financing in the United States
  2. Consolidated tax payment
  3. Coordination of new business in the United States which any in-house company does not cover
  4. Publicity including the IR
  5. Legal matters such as brand protection

Subsidiaries:

  • Nikon Precision Inc.
  • Nikon Research Corp. of America
  • Nikon Inc. Nikon Instruments Inc.
  • Nikon Eyewear Inc.

Outline of Nikon Inc. effective October 1, 2000

Name of company: Nikon Inc.

Head office: Melville, New York

Representative: ABRAMS, Jack President & CEO

Principal business: sales, marketing and after-sales service of photo imaging products and sports and recreational optics in the North and South America

The information is current as of the date of publication : (c) Nikon - Investor Relation News - 04.09.2000

Nikon establishes holding company in Europe

Nikon Corporation ( YOSHIDA, Shoichiro, president) establishes the holding company in Europe and its operation will start from October 1 this year

This company will integrally hold the whole Nikon group capital in Europe and aim for efficient financing and tax related operation in this region.

Nikon has been restructuring its operation in Europe to better cope with European unification as well as to further promote the integrated system of full authority and responsibilities for each product business sector in line with its in-house company structure which had been introduced last October. This pursuit led to establishment of the new company .

Outline of the new company

Name of company: Nikon Holdings Europe B.V.

Head office: Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Representative: IKEDA, Yoya President

Principal business:

  1. Integrated financing in Europe
  2. Coordination of new business in Europe which any in-house company does not cover
  3. Publicity including the IR
  4. Legal matters such as brand protection

Start of operation: October 1, 2000

Subsidiaries:

  • Nikon Precision Europe GmbH, Germany
  • Nikon Europe B.V., The Netherlands
  • Nikon GmbH, Germany
  • Nikon U.K. Ltd., United Kingdom
  • Nikon France S.A., France
  • Nikon AG, Switzerland
  • Nikon Svenska AB, Sweden
  • Nikon s.r.o., Czech Republic
  • Nikon Kft., Hungary
  • Nikon Instruments S.p.A., Italy

The information is current as of the date of publication : Nikon - Investor Relation News - 04.09.2000

August 25, 2000

Canon Speedlite 420EX Flash with ETTL wireless system

 

Canon USA is introducing the Speedlite 420EX, a compact flash unit developed simultaneously with the new EOS Elan 7/7E but compatible with all EOS System cameras including the new EOS D30 digital SLR. Building on the outstanding features of the popular Speedlite 380EX flash, the new 420EX replaces that product with the added capability of E-TTL wireless autoflash, giving EOS System photographers an alternative in a wireless flash system. Additionally, the 420EX’s AF-assist beam has been improved to cover all 7 focusing zones of the EOS Elan 7/7E.

“The Canon Speedlite 420EX was designed to give EOS System users extended creative options during flash photography while emphasizing Canon’s continued commitment to providing a truly advanced, cost-effective way of making better photographs,” said Yukiaki Hashimoto, vice president and general manager of Canon’s Photographic Products Group. “The new flash combines a number of Canon technologies to create a high-output, compact flash unit with wireless remote capabilities and we will continue to develop imaging products and accessories that allow photographers to concentrate on their subjects, not the technology,” Mr. Hashimoto added.

The new Speedlite 420EX can be used with most current EOS cameras as a remote flash in an E-TTL wireless autoflash system. Canon’s E-TTL wireless autoflash system is ideal for creating advanced lighting effects in a wide variety of applications such as nature photography, close-ups, and portraiture.

Remote flash firing is controlled entirely by a master unit such as Speedlite Transmitter ST-E2, Speedlite 550EX or Macro Ring Lite MR-14EX connected to the camera, making it fast and simple to set up. Up to 3 remote flash groups can be designated, and the maximum number of 550EX and 420EX Speedlites per group is unlimited. When used with the EOS-1V, EOS-3 or EOS D30 cameras, additional features such as lighting ratio control and modeling flash are also supported by the 420EX.

Canon Speedlite 420EX has a maximum Guide Number of 42/138 (ISO 100, meters/feet) and the flash head’s autozoom provides edge-to-edge coverage for focal lengths from 24mm to 105mm with bounce and swivel capabilities. Higher flash output in a more compact body (approximately 10% smaller than the Speedlite 380EX) is made possible due to a large storage capacitor and higher flash efficiency using an improved reflector and fresnel lens.

The AF-assist beam of the 420EX is emitted automatically when necessary in low light situations to ensure accurate focusing. It is capable of covering all 7 focusing points of the EOS Elan 7/7E by using two new ultra-bright LEDs that emit a cross-type pattern with vertical and horizontal stripes. The effective range of the AF-assist beam is approximately 2.7 ft. to 23 ft using the central focusing points, and approximately 2.7 ft. to 16.4 ft. for other focusing points.

The new Speedlite 420EX is powered by the user’s choice of four AA-size Alkaline, Ni-CD, Lithium or Nickel-Metal-Hydride (Ni-MH) cells, with a shooting capacity of up to 400 full-power flashes per set when AA-size lithium cells are used.

Other key features include:

With Type-A EOS System cameras (including most current models): -- E-TTL autoflash (preflash evaluative metering linked to the focusing points) -- FP Flash (high-speed sync) -- FE Lock (flash exposure lock, a form of spot metering with flash) -- Second-curtain sync (using camera’s Custom Functions) With Type-B EOS System cameras (including early EOS models and the T90): -- TTL autoflash (multi-zone off-the-film flash metering linked to the focusing points with cameras that have more than one focusing point).

With all EOS System cameras: -- Autozoom head for 24-105mm focal lengths -- Bounce and swivel -- SE (Save Energy) mode -- Shoe-lock provided

The flash measures 71.5 (W) x 123 (H) x 99.4 (D) mm and weighs 10.6 ounces. The Speedlite 420EX will be available at USA retailers in October, 2000 and have a suggested list price of $340.00.

Canon EF 28-90mm, EF 28-105mm and EF 28-200mm lenses

 

Canon USA is introducing three new zoom lenses for its line-up of EOS cameras: EF 28-90mm f/4.0-5.6 USM, EF 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5 II USM, and EF 28-200mm f/3.5-5.6 USM. The new zooms strengthen and expand Canon's selection of autofocus lenses, bringing the total number of current lenses to 56.

The new Canon EF 28-90mm f/4.0-5.6 USM lens joins an impressive line-up of multi-function, wide-angle-to-telephoto standard zoom lenses for the EOS System. It will be available initially as the standard lens for entry-level and mid-range EOS cameras including the best-selling EOS Rebel 2000 series as well as the new EOS Elan 7 and 7E. Compared to the current EF 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6 V USM standard zoom, the new EF 28-90mm USM lens provides extended telephoto range useful for portraiture and a variety of other applications with virtually no increase in size, weight or cost. This technological achievement is due in great part to the incorporation of a newly-developed optical system featuring an aspherical lens element.

The Canon EF 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5 II USM lens replaces the popular EF 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5 USM originally marketed in 1992. The new lens has the same optics and internal mechanical construction as its predecessor while sporting a new, more luxurious exterior finish and zoom ring design to match the appearance of current EF lenses.

The Canon EF 28-200mm f/3.5-5.6 USM lens allows EOS users to travel light by transporting only one lens for most focal length needs. The extended zoom range of this lens makes it ideal for a variety of photographic subjects including landscapes, portraits and sports.

The EF 28-200mm f/3.5-5.6 USM is the first Canon lens in its focal length range and provides photographers with additional creative latitude in one lens. It uses the company’s patented Super Inner Cam design to achieve the closest minimum focusing distance in its class (17.7 inches at all focal lengths), resulting in an unprecedented magnification factor of 0.28x for spectacular close-up photography at the 200mm setting. Due to the inner focusing design, the lens’ filter thread remains stationary, allowing users to add attachments such as circular polarizing or graduated neutral density filters without being hindered by lens rotation. Two aspherical surfaces are incorporated for high image quality at all focal lengths, and a Micro USM makes the new EF 28-200mm lens the only zoom in its class to feature Ultrasonic Motor technology for high-speed and silent autofocusing.

The Canon EF 28-90mm f/4.0-5.6 USM lens weighs 7.1 oz. and measure 2-5/8 inches (diameter) x 2-13/16 inches (minimum length).

The Canon EF 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5 II USM lens weighs 13.1 oz. and measures 2-3/4 inches (diameter) x 3 inches (minimum length).

The Canon EF 28-200mm f/3.5-5.6 USM lens weighs 1.1 lb. and measures 3-1/8 inches (diameter) x 3-1/2 inches (minimum length).

All three lenses will be available at USA photo retailers in October, 2000 and have the following suggested list prices:

Canon EF 28-90mm f/4.0-5.6 USM lens $250.00
Canon EF 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5 II USM lens $540.00
Canon EF 28-200mm f/3.5-5.6 USM lens $800.00

August 22, 2000

Olympus Camedia E-10 Digital SLR Camera

Olympus Camedia E-10 Digital SLR Camera


Fuelled by the introduction of models offering 3-megapixel-plus imaging and other advanced features, the digital camera market continues to experience explosive growth. A number of digital SLRs have also been introduced, but with respect to price and product availability, virtually all of these have been aimed at the photojournalist and professional markets.
Olympus Optical Co., Ltd., however, has emphasized the development of consumer-oriented models since it first entered the digital camera market. In the fall of 1997, it introduced its first digital SLR, the CAMEDIA C-1400L. This was followed in the fall of 1999 by the CAMEDIA C-2500L digital SLR. Now, with the launch of the CAMEDIA E-10, it has a flagship digital SLR that breaks significant new ground in terms of image quality and functionality. Despite being brought to market at moderate price, the CAMEDIA E-10 offers truly outstanding photo-imaging quality, functionality, reliability and features. As such, it brings ultra-high digital SLR performance to a much wider market segment than ever before.
The CAMEDIA E-10 is the first camera in its class to feature a 4-megapixel*, 2/3-inch, primary-color CCD. In addition, by freeing its lens designers from the constraints of conventional 35mm-format interchangeable lens design, Olympus was able to develop a new 4x optical zoom lens that is specifically designed to match the size and performance characteristics of CAMEDIA E-10's CCD. In addition to offering 4x zoom, the lens has the exceptional light-gathering power of an F2-F2.4 aperture range. One ED (Extra-low Dispersion) and two aspherical lens elements are used to assure excellent edge-to-edge resolving power, and all lens elements are multicoated to limit internal reflection and assure crisp, clear imaging. Other advanced features include TruePic image processing, which assures that 4-megapixel image data is accurately represented at all output resolutions, and a new white-balance function for superior image quality in a wide range of shooting situations.
A shutter-release lag-time of only about 60 milliseconds was achieved by using a proprietary new auto exposure algorithm and a dual active/passive autofocus system for high-speed focusing. As a result, responsiveness and shooting ease are truly outstanding.
A variety of extension lenses, external flash unit "FL-40 electronic flash" and a remote cable and a wireless remote control are also available, making the CAMEDIA E-10 a digital SLR camera that is fully able to meet the needs of commercial and professional users.
* Number of effective pixels is 3,900,000.

Main Features
1. Professional-Oriented, Ultra-High Image Quality
4-Megapixel 2/3-Inch Primary-Color CCD At 4,000,000 pixels (3,900,000 effective), the CAMEDIA E-10's CCD imaging device offers the highest resolution currently available in a consumer-use digital camera. In addition, the CCD's large, 2/3-inch imaging area ensures excellent tonal sensitivity, while primary-color filtering is used to ensure vivid color reproduction.
Large-Aperture, High-Performance 4x Optical Zoom Lens
The lens is an F2-F2.4, equivalent to 35-140mm (in a 35mm format) bright, large-aperture zoom lens that is specifically designed to maximize the imaging potential of the camera's CCD. An ED glass lens element minimizes color aberration, and two aspherical lens elements correct distortion. In addition, all lens elements are multi-coated to ensure exceptionally crisp imaging.
Proprietary TruePic Image Processing
A refined version of the TruePic processing algorithm introduced on the CAMEDIA C-2500L ensures superior image quality at any resolution. As a result, even small images can take full advantage of the CCD's 4-megapixel imaging power.
Digital ESP Metering for Correct Exposures
New auto-exposure algorithms assure balanced exposures. In addition, the camera offers a choice of center-weighted average metering or spot metering.
New White-Balance System for Natural Skin Tones
A newly developed white-balance system provides more accurate assessment of white values than previous systems. Color fidelity is enhanced, and skin tones are more natural and lifelike.

2. Professional-Oriented Speed and Responsiveness
Dual Autofocus System for Quick Focusing
Fast, accurate focusing is provided by an advanced dual autofocus system that combines single-beam, twin-sensor active AF technology with passive AF technology. After initial measurement is made with the single-beam, twin sensor system, fine tuning is carried out with the passive system. In extreme low-light conditions, the twin-sensor active system alone can be used, thus greatly extending the range of situations in which digital photographs can be taken.
Shutter-Release Lag Time of Only 60ms (approx.)
A shutter-release lag-time is only about 60 milliseconds when LCD monitor and internal flash are turned off. Shutter release is smooth and responsive for stress-free shooting.
4-Shot Continuous Shooting at Speeds Up To 3 fps
A 32MB buffer memory and dedicated ASIC (Application-Specific Integrated Circuit) provide high-speed image processing for megapixel images. As a result, continuous shooting capability is offered in all image quality modes, up to a maximum of four frames at three frames-per-second.
High-Capacity Lithium-Polymer Battery Support
An optional Power Battery Holder Kit and high-capacity lithium-polymer batteries can be used to handle long photo sessions and high-volume shooting.
4 ISO Sensitivity Settings
ISO sensitivity settings include Auto, 80, 160 and 320, allowing photographers to shoot indoors without flash and avoid camera-shake blurring on telephoto shots.
Rugged, Die-Cast Aluminium Body
The rugged, die-cast aluminium body is built to withstand the rigors of adverse shooting conditions.
3. Professional-Oriented Features and Functions
TTL Viewfinder with 95% Field of View
The TTL viewfinder eliminates framing errors caused by parallax displacement and provides a field of view that covers 95% of the total image area. Indicators within the viewfinder allow essential settings to be confirmed without taking the eye away from the eyepiece. In addition, the eyepiece features -3 - +1 dioptric correction and a special shutter that prevents light from entering the eyepiece when a picture is taken.
Multi-Angle 1.8-Inch TFT Color LCD Monitor
A quick-response 1.8-inch color LCD monitor allows captured images to be instantly viewed. It can also be used as a viewfinder, with multi-angle display that provides a clear view for waist-level or high-angle shooting.
Fast, Easy Mode Selection
Individual buttons are provided for all frequently used shooting modes, and are positioned for easy access when the camera is held in the normal shooting grip.
Advanced Flash Control System
A powerful GN13 (ISO 80) pop-up flash is built-in. Featuring advanced 'scene detection' technology, it automatically adjusts flash illumination to suit the subject's position, assuring beautiful auto flash exposures. +/- 2-step flash power compensation can also be used to achieve an ideal balance between natural light and flash illumination. In addition to forced (fill-in), slow-synchro and red-eye reduction modes, the flash also offers rear-curtain synchronization. An optional FL-40 external flash unit can also be connected via hot shoe or cable for full-auto, dual-flash shooting, and an external PC synchro socket allows other external flash units to be connected for multi-flash shooting.
Wide Selection of Exposure Modes
Four exposure modes are offered: Program AE, Aperture-Priority AE, Shutter-Speed- Priority AE, and Manual. Aperture and shutter speed can be quickly set via an electronic dial, and an AE Lock button is positioned so that it can easily be pressed with the right thumb. The wide range of exposure settings allows photographers to take full advantage of the exceptionally bright lens, and to easily capture long bulb exposures at night.
Versatile Exposure Control
+/- 3EV exposure compensation can be set in 1/3EV-step increments. With Auto bracketing function, the camera can shoot sequent shots of 3 frames in 1/3, 2/3 and 1EV steps.
Three White Balance Modes
In addition to Auto White Balance, one-touch White Balance can be stored in memory to assure correct color balance when shooting under various types of light source. Photographers can also achieve the precise color balance they want by choosing from seven manual White Balance settings (3000K, 3700K, 4000K, 4500K, 5500K, 6500K and 7500K).
Three Image Sharpness Settings
Hard, Normal and Soft image sharpness settings allow photographers to choose the level of image sharpness that best suits their purpose (i.e., printing, image manipulation, etc.).
Three Contrast Settings
High, Normal and Low contrast settings can be selected according to the photographer's preference.
Manual Focus
A focusing ring is provided to allow easy manual focusing when shooting subjects that are difficult for the autofocus system to handle.
Macro Mode
Macro photos can be taken from as close as 20cm at any zoom setting. At maximum magnification, an area of 76mm x 57mm fills the frame.
SmartMedia and CompactFlash Memory Card Support
Slots are provided for both 3V (3.3V) SmartMedia and CompactFlash memory cards of up to 128MB. Both types can be used simultaneously to extend memory capacity for worry-free, high-resolution shooting. The slots are linked, and a dedicated button is provided for slot switching. In addition, images can be copied from one card to the other at any time.
Raw Image Data File Storage
Unprocessed, raw data can be saved to allow subsequent high-level processing for printing or commercial purposes. A dedicated Adobe(r) Photoshop(r) plug-in will be also provided.
USB Support
A USB interface is provided to facilitate downloading of large image files. In addition, USB Storage Class support allows image files to be accessed using standard personal computer directory protocols.
4. System-Oriented Options and Accessories
4 Types of High-Performance Extension Lenses
3x focal length telephoto (420mm equivalent*; F2.8), 1.45x telephoto (200mm equivalent*; F2.4), 0.8x focal length wide-angle (28mm equivalent*; F2.0) and macro (49 x 37mm full-frame image area) extension lenses are available to extend shooting flexibility.
* Focal length is in a 35mm format.
Product Name
Tele Extension Lens Pro TCON-300S
Tele Extension Lens Pro TCON-14B
Wide Extension Lens Pro WCON-08B
Macro Extension Lens Pro MCON-35
Versatile Power Supply Options
An optional B-30LPS Power Battery Holder Kit with high-capacity lithium-polymer batteries is available for long photo sessions and high-volume shooting.
FL-40 Electronic Flash for Creative Flash Photography
A powerful GN40 dedicated external flash unit with a rotating head for creative bounce-flash photography.
Remote Cable Release
The RM-CB1 Remote Cable allows remote shutter operation.The multi-function RM-1 is an optional remote control unit that allows functions such as shooting and image playback to be controlled from a distance. Can also be used to control the camera when it is being used as a playback device for slideshows and business presentations displayed on a video monitor.
5. Other Features and Functions
Shooting data such as aperture and shutter speed can be displayed on the monitor when viewing images.
Image histograms can be displayed on the monitor.
Time-lapse shooting intervals can be set from one minute to 24 hours.
Control panel is equipped with backlight.
Audible shutter release can be set to High, Low or Mute.
Olympus Optical Co., Ltd. was changed to OLYMPUS CORPORATION as of October 1, 2003. The company names and product names are the trademarks or registered trademarks of each company. Pictures (c) Olympus Corporation - Olympus Press Release - 22.08.2000 Update: 20.02.2001.

July 26, 2000

Punch’s Progress: A Century of American Puppetry Exhibition

Punch's Progress: A Century of American Puppetry
Traveling Detroit Institute of Arts Exhibition
Venues: September 2000 - April 2002

Dancing on nimble fingers or twirling from strings, puppets have taught and entertained generations from America's earliest days. The Detroit Institute of Arts traces this amazing trajectory in Punch's Progress: A Century of American Puppetry. Touring statewide, the exhibition provides an opportunity to enjoy the history, wonder and artistry of puppets. Punch's Progress is one of many traveling exhibitions the museum organizes to help fulfill its mission of extending its reach to various communities.

The Detroit Institute of Arts is home to one of the most historically important puppet collections in North America. Drawn from the critically acclaimed Paul McPharlin Collection, this exhibition includes fanciful marionettes, rod, hand and shadow puppets that delight audiences and reveal the importance of American puppetry and puppeteers. Included are diverse works, ranging from American wooden puppets to elegant marionettes of popular icons, such as entertainer Josephine Baker, skater Sonja Henie and former President Franklin D. Roosevelt as Punch's baby.

Puppet shows were popular in frontier America, and by the turn of the century elaborately detailed figures performed to live audiences in music halls. Professional puppet troupes toured the vaudeville theater circuit, often accompanied by full orchestras. During the 1920s, puppetry became recognized and appreciated by educational and arts organizations, and classic literature was often performed. During the late 1930s to early 1940s, cabaret puppetry for adults was popular, and the first puppets for a growing new medium, television, were created. Puppetry quickly became popular mass entertainment, often directed at children. Punch's Progress explores the wonder and evolution of this popular art.

Punch's Progress: A Century of American Puppetry will appear in the following venues:
Muskegon Museum of Art, September 7 - October 22, 2000
Detroit Institute of Arts, November 19 - December 31, 2000
Meadow Brook Art Gallery, January 12 - February 25, 2001
Port Huron Museum, May 5 - June 24, 2001
Ella Sharp Museum, November 17, 2001 - January 13, 2002
Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, February 1 - April 28, 2002

This exhibition was organized by the Detroit Institute of Arts and is supported by a generous grant from the Consumers Energy Foundation. Additional support provided by the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs and the City of Detroit.

.

July 25, 2000

Creation of a Center for African American Art in Detroit, Michigan

Museum News > Michigan > Detroit > Detroit Institute of Arts

ART Photo Wanafoto
The creation of the General Motors Center for African American Art was announced by the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) as a new curatorial department and resource center at the museum. The Center is named in recognition of a $5 million donation from the General Motors Foundation to the DIA's capital campaign.

The Center will act as an independent department within the museum's existing structure, and will be staffed by a curator, assistant curator and administrative assistant. A national search for staff is currently underway.
"The development of the General Motors Center for African American Art is a natural extension of the DIA's commitment to African American art, and will provide a stimulating new dimension to our collections," said Graham W.J. Beal, director of the DIA. "We intend to create a center of excellence in this area, which will prove to be an invaluable resource for scholars and collectors, as it will house a specialized library related to works by African American artists."

The Center is a testament to the DIA's and GM's commitment to serving the community. "General Motors is dedicated to recognizing the achievements and influence of African Americans," said General Motors vice president and chief financial officer, Michael Losh. "GM is proud to support this extraordinary Center that will enrich and expand the breadth of the museum in both culture and importance."

Early emphasis will be on research that will lead to special exhibitions, lectures and symposia. Additionally, the Center will provide a place where talented African American students can gain valuable experience in a stimulating environment to prepare them for an art museum career.

"I've spoken with Christy Matthews, director of the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, and we agreed that there could be interesting opportunities for collaboration," Beal said. "While it is difficult to be specific at this early stage, these might include loans of art to parallel exhibitions, joint educational initiatives, and mutual programming around exhibitions."

With a solid core of artistic expertise, intellectual acumen, a powerfully growing collection and a vitally interested local community, the DIA expects the Center will quickly gain national prominence and become a leading contributor to the field of study in African American art. The Center's work will be disseminated through publications such as exhibition catalogues and seminar proceedings.

The DIA is located at 5200 Woodward Avenue in the University Cultural Center in Detroit, Michigan.


Updated post

July 16, 2000

Digital art works at Macworld Expo 2000 for the first time

 

Digital art Close to three dozen pieces of the best digital artwork from North America will be featured for the first time at Macworld's Digital Art Contest & Gallery, July 18-21, 2000 at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center.

Thirty-one award-winning designs, incorporating a variety of styles and disciplines, were selected from more than 600 images submitted by artists, professional graphic designers, hobbyists and students. Featuring artists' demonstrations, as well as examples of the latest software, products and techniques used to create digital art pieces, the Digital Art Contest and Gallery highlights the finest efforts in this rapidly growing art medium. Now in its third year, the Macworld Conference & Expo Digital Art Gallery also travels during the year as a formal exhibition to art galleries and universities throughout the U.S. to highlight this exciting new medium.

Divided into two judging categories, student and non-student, the thirty winning selections were chosen in three separate judging phases by a panel of leading experts from the digital art community, including:

 

·    Nancy Hitchcock, Sr. Assoc. Editor, Electronic Publishing,
·    Harold Helderman, Director, Center for Electronic Arts, SF,
·    Daniel Carter, Design Director, WIRED Magazine,
·    Karen Sperling, Editor and Publisher, Artistry Magazine,
·    Rick DeCoyte, Owner, Silicon Gallery, Philadelphia, PA,
·    Bert Monroy, Digital Artist, Teacher, Author,
·    John Derry, digital artist/co-creator of Painter
·    Pedro Meyer, photographer, artist
·    Diane Fenster, digital artist

 

"The quality of the artwork this year is better than ever," according to Daryl Wise, Coordinator of the Macworld Conference & Expo Digital Art Contest and Gallery. "The artwork is professionally presented, and attendees are going to be impressed to see what these talented artists can do with this medium."

The grand prize winner of the Digital Art Contest receives a trip to a future Macworld Conference & Expo, including airfare, hotel and a Super Pass, along with a variety of new hardware and software. Other prizes include: Iomega Jaz drives, Wacom Intuos Graphic Tablets, Printers by Tektronix, Aladdin Systems utility software, subscriptions to Artistry, WIRED and Digital Fine Artist Magazines, Royality-free Klips from Comstock, asset management software from Canto, books by Peachpit Press and an Iris print of their image by Electric Paintbrush.

The Digital Art Contest and Gallery is sponsored by Iomega, Corel, Wacom, National Association of Photoshop Professionals and Tektronix printers by Xerox.

June 30, 2000

Visatec Solo Kit 308 Photo Studio Flash

The kit contents can be individually customised to the photographer's needs, and expanded at any time. It is no bigger than a travel bag. The Visatec SOLO Kit 308 is based on the Visatec SOLO 800 B. Compare to the Solo Kits 108 and 208, the 308 is a more comprehensive for bigger jobs. It comprises three compact units with numerous accessories.
The most impressive features of the Visatec SOLO 800 B are its light output, stepless 3 f-stops output range, proportional halogen modelling light and built-in photocell. The patented bayonet allows reflectors to be quickly interchanged and rotated a full 360°; it will accept any of the wide assortment of Visatec light shapers.
The case keeps everything nicely organized, protects its valuable contents from damage and offers a studio or location flash system that is always ready for action.
Photo (c) Visatec / Bron Elektronik AG - Tous droits réservés - http://www.bron.ch/
Other posts about Visatec products:

June 29, 2000

Visatec Solo Kit 208 Photo Studio Flash

The Visatec Solo Kit 208 contents can be individually customised to the photographer's needs, and expanded at any time. The kit is no bigger than a travel bag. It is based on the Visatec SOLO 800 B and contains two flash units with appropriate accessories.
The most impressive features of the Visatec SOLO 800 B are its light output, stepless 3 f-stops output range, proportional halogen modelling light and built-in photocell. The patented bayonet allows reflectors to be quickly interchanged and rotated a full 360°; it will accept any of the wide assortment of Visatec light shapers.
The case keeps everything nicely organized, protects its valuable contents from damage and offers a studio or location flash system that is always ready for action.
Photo (c) Visatec / Bron Electronik AG - Tous droits réservés - www.bron.ch

Visatec Solo Kit 108 Photo Studio Light

The Swiss lighting specialist has assembled a practical kit designed for cost-conscious photographers using medium-format and 35 mm cameras. The handy travel bag contains one Visatec SOLO 800 B compact flash unit (including flash tube, 300 W modelling light, protecting glass and protection cap) along with a standard reflector, umbrella reflector, white umbrella and 5 m synchronous cable.
The most impressive features of the Visatec SOLO 800 B are its light output, stepless 3 f-stops output range, proportional halogen modelling light and built-in photocell. The patented bayonet allows reflectors to be quickly interchanged and rotated a full 360°; it will accept any of the wide assortment of Visatec light shapers.
The dimensions of the case are just 51x20x36 cm (outside dimensions), and it weighs only 6,5 kg. The kit can therefore be taken onto any airliner as cabin baggage, or carried on the luggage rack of a bike.
Photo (c) Visatec / Bron Electronik AG - Tous droits réservés - http://www.bron.ch/

Regard derriere l ecran de la TV

Rubrique Magazines et Revues > Dans les revues de la Documentation française
La Documentation française publie dans sa collection Les Etudes de La Documentation française un ouvrage intitulé Télévision de pénurie, télévision d'abondance. Des origines à Internet de Rémy Le Champion et Benoît Danard avec une préface d'Hervé Bourges. La télévision est entrée dans tous les foyers. Cependant, que connaît-on d'elle aujourd'hui au-delà des apparences ? Car si le secteur est devenu une véritable industrie, l'économie de l'audiovisuel s'avère bien plus complexe et subtile qu'il n'y paraît. Rémy Le Champion et Benoît Danard visent à faire mieux comprendre les règles et les mécanismes de fonctionnement de ce qui se passe derrière l'écran. Ils présentent l'évolution rapide du secteur, ses enjeux, ses perspectives, à travers notamment ses rapports avec l'État - la forte croissance de ce marché ayant surtout bénéficié aux acteurs privés. Leur analyse, originale et didactique, rassemble des données multiples, aussi bien sur les télévisions généralistes publiques ou privées que sur les chaînes thématiques, la télévision à péage, le câble, le satellite et la télévision numérique. Hier, la télévision publique n'offrait que quelques heures quotidiennes de programmes. Aujourd'hui, les images se bousculent sur les écrans. Ce n'est qu'un début. Si la télévision de pénurie n'a plus cours, la véritable télévision d'abondance reste encore à venir. La question est à présent de savoir selon quelles règles les télévisions de service public et les télévisions privées peuvent coexister dans un monde où les révolutions technologiques s'accélèrent et la concurrence s'accentue. Rémy Le Champion, professeur associé à l'Université Paris II-IMAC, est producteur et animateur d'un magazine hebdomadaire sur les nouvelles technologies de l'information, diffusé par Canal-Web. Il exerce des fonctions d'expert auprès de la Commission européenne. Benoît Danard, chef du service des études, des statistiques et de la prospective du Centre national de la cinématographie, est chargé d'enseignement en économie des médias à l'Université de Paris IX-Dauphine et ancien responsable des analyses économiques du Conseil supérieur de l'audiovisuel. Télévision de pénurie, télévision d'abondance Des origines à Internet Rémy Le Champion et Benoît Danard La Documentation française
Collection Les études de la Documentation française 224 pages, 19 €

April 30, 2000

Visatec Solo 800 B Photo Studio Light

The Swiss flash unit manufacturer Bron Elektronik has supplemented its product line with a compact unit which has a f-stop of 45 2/3 with standard reflector at a distance of 1 m (100 ISO). The output of the Visatec SOLO 800 B can be controlled continuously over 3 f-stops. The halogen modelling light with 150 W can be set to three operating modes: 1. Full output independent of the chosen flash energy, 2. proportional to chosen flash energy or 3.
"dim", which means that the modelling light is reduced during recharge and allows the photographer to check whether all flash units have triggered. The built-in infrared-sensitive photocell can be used to trigger several units in a time-synchronous manner. The supplied protective transport cap and protecting glass protect the flashtube and the modelling light from damage. The coated flashtube ensures precise colour reproduction. It is pluggable and can be exchanged by the photographer himself. The new device comes in a sturdy aluminium housing. The unique bayonet catch allows a rapid exchange of the light shapers. They can be turned by 360°. An extensive range of accessories is available for the Visatec SOLO 800 B. Ideally matched to the flash unit, it allows the photographer to shape the light creatively in a large number of ways. The new Visatec is also available in kits with two or three compact units and accessories.
Photo (c) Visatec / Bron Electronik AG - Tous droits reservés - http://www.bron.ch/

April 7, 2000

Davies, Grauerholz, Kozyra, Muller-Pohle, Smith at the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago

 

The Museum of Contemporary Photography, Columbia College Chicago, presents exhibitions by five prominent contemporary artists working with photography: John Davies (UK), Angela Grauerholz (Germany), Katarzyna Kozyra (Poland), Andreas Müller-Pohle (Germany), and Seton Smith (USA, resides in France). The works on view have never before been shown in Chicago.

 

JOHN DAVIES

In his silver gelatin prints, John Davies concentrates on investigating the modern landscape as it has evolved from natural to industrial environments. Although his work is informed by documentary photography, he does not present exclusively "objective" perspectives. He is famous for his ability to capture the "edge" between the urban and the rural, with precision and calculated detachment. These rich, black-and-white images of arresting open spaces reveal urban development both in and out of harmony with the natural environment.

 

ANGELA GRAUERHOLZ

Angela Grauerholz's work Sententia I to LXII, 1998, is comprised of sixty-two images housed in a specially made wooden cabinet that resembles a piece of antique library furniture, a fine retail display case, or, when closed, a tomb. To see the images, the viewer must slide the photographs from the case one at a time. The massive cabinet suggests permanence, importance, and authority. The photographs, however, are ambiguous and moody, soft-focus images of transitional spaces: windows, doors, railroad tracks, a fleeting glimpse of passers-by. This juxtaposition of image content and an unusual presentation raises questions regarding the veracity of information housed in historic archives and underscores the role of the archive as a place of intellectual "travel."

 

KATARZYNA KOZYRA

Katarzyna Kozyra made headlines in 1999 as the Polish representative at the Venice Biennale with her video piece entitled The Men's Bathhouse, for which she gathered footage by entering a men's bathhouse in Budapest disguised as a man and carrying a hidden camera. At The Museum of Contemporary Photography she is exhibiting a similar piece, The Bathhouse, 1997, shot clandestinely in a women's spa in Budapest. This video installation, comprising one large video projection and five video monitors, opens with Ingres’s painting The Turkish Bath. The painting, which depicts women as idealized figures fitting perfectly into a circular composition, provides a stark contrast to Katarzyna Kozyra’s video footage, which follows. By presenting the nude figure in its unashamed, unabashed form, she raises issues of voyeurism and privacy rights, as well as drawing attention to the fact that uncorrected, unimproved nudity is not often visible in our culture.

 

ANDREAS MULLER-POHLE

Andreas Müller-Pohle, a founding editor of European Photography magazine, believes that digital work is the purest form of the photographic medium owing to its universality. His Digital Scores I, II, and III, 1995—1998, are digital interpretations of the earliest known photograph, Nicephore Niepce's View from his Study, taken in 1826. In these works, Andreas Muller-Pohle has digitized Niepce's photograph, which presumably had an eight-hour exposure time, translated it into alphanumeric signs, and output it as ink-jet prints. The information contained in the resulting seven million bytes has been distributed over eight squares which are hung four across and two high, with each frame installed eight centimeters apart. In contrast, Andreas Müller-Pohle's video piece Entropia, 1996, shows an industrial shredder destroying photographs, lithographic films, and framed pictures. "What I don't see, I photograph. What I don't photograph, I see," Andreas Müller-Pohle has said.

 

SETON SMITH

Seton Smith's work Pale Guide to Transparent Things, 1997, examines the convergence of spaces: interior/exterior, public/private, real/imagined, past/present. This series is presented as an installation of large-scale (six-by-four feet) color transparencies mounted on light boxes and arranged on the walls and floor of the gallery. Recontextualized in the museum, the images interact with as well as change and add to the architecture of the space itself. Seton Smith's use of soft focus, tight cropping, and monochromatic colors alters the real objects she photographs, including Chinese-style chairs, seats in an auditorium, and institutional fluorescent lights. The resulting series of ambiguous images share a formal unity despite their disparate subjects. These images are unresolved, yet the scenes pictured seem vaguely familiar, as if recalled from dream or memory. "I create scenes, but they are open to interpretation. People project their own experiences onto them," Seton Smith says of this work.

 

Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago

April 8 - June 10, 2000

 

The exhibitions, presentations, and related programs of The Museum of Contemporary Photography are supported in part by grants from The Chicago Community Trust; The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation; the Sara Lee Foundation; the Illinois Arts Council, a state agency, and the National Endowment for the Arts. This project is also sponsored in part by LOT Polish Airlines and Halina's European Restaurant & Deli. This ongoing series of exhibitions is principally sponsored by American Airlines, the official airlines of The Museum of Contemporary Photography.

February 25, 2000

Lyson at Art Expo 2000 in New York

The Art Expo event will be held at the Jacob Javits Convention Center in New York City between the 9th and 13th of March 2000. Lyson, together with US distributor I-Lab, will exhibit various fine art images printed with Lyson inks on Lyson fine art papers. Iris Giclees, provided by US Printmakers, will be shown, and in addition portfolios of work by distinguished American and European photographers will display the latest ink set offerings that are now at the forefront of the emerging Digital Photographic Fine Art sector. Lyson's stand number is 1409. http://www.lyson.com/

February 9, 2000

Cesar Martinez, A.J. Quiroz, A.Turok at Apex Art

 

Alfred J. Quiros Untitled 1999 

 Chispa

Cèsar Martìnez
Alfred J. Quiróz
Antonio Turok

Curated by Luis Jimenez

 

  © Alfred J. Quiros,
  Untitled, 1999
  Courtesy the artist
  and Apex Art, NY

 

Three Latino artists, Cèsar Martìnez of Texas, Alfred J. Quiróz of Arizona, and Antonio Turok from Chiapas, have profoundly changed the way their culture and art is seen in their communities and beyond - like a chispa, a spark in Spanish, that ignites a fire.

A brochure containing an essay by Luis Jimenez will be available free of charge.

 

APEX ART Curatorial Program
February 9 - March 11, 2000

February 3, 2000

Canon Macro Ring Lite MR-14EX flash

 

Canon USA introduces at PMA 2000 an advanced and versatile flash unit for macro photography available in any 35mm SLR system.

The new Canon Macro Ring Lite MR-14EX provides professional photographers with full E-TTL flash capability -- when used with any EOS System camera that supports E-TTL metering -- and supports TTL auto flash plus manual flash exposure control on all EOS System cameras. Supplying a powerful Guide Number of 46 (ISO 100/ft.), the MR-14EX incorporates a host of new flash and metering features, including Flash Exposure Lock, high-speed sync, variable power manual flash, Wireless Remote functions, two independent flash heads and 7 Custom Functions for tremendous flexibility.

“While Canon has enjoyed great success with its line of EOS System cameras, much of that success has been built around the entire system, including our line of lenses and flash accessories,” said Yukiaki Hashimoto, vice president and general manger , Photographic Products Group, Canon U.S.A., Inc. “From the outset, our goal is to provide photographers with a complete system of products that are compatible throughout the product line. The new Macro Ring Lite is just one example of how Canon is constantly striving to provide our customers with the most comprehensive selection of compatible products in the industry.”

Flash Exposure Lock / High-Speed Sync: With E-TTL compatible EOS cameras, photographers can utilize other functions beyond conventional flash photography, including Flash Exposure Lock and FP Flash. The Flash Exposure Lock (FEL) feature (a form of spot metering for flash) allows users to take a light reading from any given spot within the viewfinder, using the camera’s spot or partial metering modes. This virtually guarantees that the most critical area of a scene will be perfectly exposed, even if it is placed off-center for better composition.

In addition, the MR-14EX can be automatically synchronized to the camera’s maximum shutter speed using the FP flash (high-speed sync) feature. Photographers can now use higher shutter speeds and wider apertures outdoors in any lighting condition to achieve greater creative control.

Variable Power Flash: The new Macro Ring Lite MR-14EX mounts directly to Canon EF Macro lenses and features two flash tubes that can be used together or independently. When both flashes are fired in E-TTL and used together with the EOS-1v or EOS-3, lighting ratios can be set in ½ stop increments up to +/- 3 stops. This provides photographers with extensive creative control even in the most difficult lighting conditions, while offering tremendous exposure latitude for a wide range of subject matter.

Lighting ratios can also be controlled between the left and right tubes, even when the flash is placed in its manual mode, and users can select variable power settings over a 7-stop range down to 1/64th power. This feature is available with the Canon T90 SLR and all EOS cameras, even those that are not compatible with E-TTL.

Wireless Remote Functions: Macro Ring Lite MR-14EX is compatible with Canon’s exclusive E-TTL wireless autoflash system. Using this advanced technology, photographers can now set up unlimited numbers of 550EX Speedlite flash units around the subject. Similar to the wireless system in the EOS-3, the strategically placed off-camera 550EX flashes are fired in sync with the Macro Ring Lite with no need for connecting cords. In addition, photographers can adjust and maintain full control of lighting ratios via the LCD panel on the control unit, providing even greater lighting precision.

Custom Functions: The new Macro Ring Lite is also equipped with twin focusing lamps and a set of 7 Custom Functions that allow the user to modify flash operation for specific shooting conditions. Supported features include Flash Exposure Bracketing, Modeling Flash, and Wireless Flash control.

Pricing and Availability: The Canon MR-14EX flash requires 4 AA-size batteries and is equipped with a socket for optional external power supplies such as the Canon Compact Battery Pack CP-E2 to reduce recycling time and increase the number of flashes per set of batteries.

The Canon Macro Ring Lite MR-14EX flash unit will be available at USA dealers in March, 2000 and have a suggested list price of $750.

Other posts on Canon’s flashes

Canon Speedlite 550EX flash and wireless Speedlite Transmitter ST-E2

Canon Speedlite 420EX with E-TTL wireless system

Updated Post

February 2, 2000

Brassaï / Picasso  
Conversations avec la lumière
Musée Picasso, Paris 
2 février - 1er mai 2000

Prenant place dans le cycle d’expositions que le musée Picasso consacre, depuis 1994, aux relations que le peintre entretenait avec la photographie, cette exposition s’intéresse à sa collaboration avec Brassaï (1899-1984). Grâce à des enrichissements récents des collections du musée, elle présente pour la première fois un ensemble significatif de leur travail commun autour de deux grands thèmes : les photographies de sculptures et les diverses utilisations de la technique du cliché-verre.

Brassaï et Picasso se rencontrent en 1932 par l’intermédiaire de Tériade, qui commande pour le premier numéro de la revue Minotaure une série de vues de l’atelier, rue La Boétie, et des récentes sculptures en plâtre réalisées par Picasso à Boisgeloup. Par la suite, de 1943 à 1946, c’est l’ensemble de l’œuvre sculpté que Brassaï photographie pour Les Sculptures de Picasso, 1949, publié aux éditions du Chêne, avec une préface de Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler. Entre 1932 et 1946, Brassaï photographie donc de manière systématique l’œuvre sculpté de Picasso, alors à peu près inconnu. A cette occasion s’engage entre les deux artistes un dialogue sur les natures respectives de la photographie et de la sculpture. Conversations avec Picasso, publié par Brassaï en 1964, a rendu célèbre les détours et les rebondissements de ce dialogue.

En 1996, le musée Picasso acquiert la totalité du fonds photographique de Brassaï traitant de la vie et de l’œuvre de Picasso. L’ensemble constitue la plus riche collection publique consacrée au photographe, avec plus de 440 images. L’exposition en présente 150, en grande partie inédites, autour de petites séquences qui les associent aux plâtres, bois, bronzes ou papiers déchirés de Picasso. Par le changement du point de vue, du cadrage ou de l’éclairage, Brassaï propose ici ce qui serait son « manifeste » de la photographie de sculpture.

Un soir de décembre 1932, Brassaï oublie une petite plaque photographique vierge dans l’atelier, rue La Boétie. Picasso s’en empare et y grave un portrait de Marie-Thérèse. L’épisode est décisif pour Brassaï, qui écrira plus tard à Picasso : « C’est vous qui avez réveillé en moi le démon du dessin » (lettre du 15 mai 1945, archives Picasso, Paris). Par la suite chacun des deux artistes va expérimenter à sa manière la technique du cliché-verre.

Ce travail de tirage d’épreuves photographiques à partir d’une plaque de verre peinte (Picasso) ou d’une plaque photographique gravée (Brassaï) allie les potentialités de la photographie, de la gravure et du dessin. En 1934-1935, Brassaï réalise plus de 150 « grattages » à partir d’une trentaine de négatifs de « nus » datant des années 1931-1935. L’exposition présente les différents états de ces « grattages » : « La photographie s’est parfois volatilisée. Parfois quelques débris en ont survécu ; un bout de sein frémissant, un visage en raccourci, une cuisse, un bras. » (Brassaï, Transmutations). A son tour Picasso développe encore l’expérience en 1936-1937, par une série de quatre grands clichés verre peints à l’huile dont il tire une vingtaine d’épreuves, superposant aux plaques de verre des papiers découpés, des pièces de tissus ou des objets.

Grâce à la dation Dora Maar, l’ensemble des plaques et des tirages de Picasso est récemment entré dans les collections du musée Picasso. Il était resté inédit, hors quatre reproductions publiées dans Cahiers d’art en 1937. De son côté, Brassaï avait publié en 1967 douze images de ses recherches de 1934-1935, sous le titre de Transmutations. Les quelque 60 épreuves et les 26 négatifs originaux présentés ici permettent de mesurer l’intérêt des résultats obtenus par le photographe.

L’exposition s’enrichit encore des planches-contact de travail de Brassaï, souvent annotées et rehaussées, de pièces d’archive, d’ouvrages, de dessins et de dédicaces qui forment les jalons de l’exceptionnelle collaboration de Brassaï et Picasso.

Célébrant le centenaire de la naissance de Brassaï (9 septembre 1899), l’exposition révèle pour Brassaï comme pour Picasso un aspect de leur œuvre tenu secret et dont la dynamique dépend pour l’essentiel de leur fascination commune pour la photographie et la sculpture, le dessin et la photographie. De ces techniques, ils font des univers. Les interrogeant sans relâche, chacun d’eux en réinvente les formes de manière décisive. A un moment où la recherche se porte sur les ressorts de la création au XXe siècle, il a paru utile de reconstituer le fil ténu de ce dialogue où Brassaï et Picasso se tentent, se défient et se répondent dans le langage de la photographie. 

Commissariat : Anne Baldassari, conservateur au musée Picasso

Publications : catalogue, 344 pages, 320 illustrations en couleur, 385 F (58,69€) ; Petit Journal, 16 pages, 15 F, éditions RMN

Musée national Picasso
Hôtel Salé - 5, rue de Thorigny - 75003 Paris